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Trickers

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Can anyone provide details on the quality of Trickers shoes/boots.  I am familar with Edward Green, J M Weston, and Alden.  I am particulary looking at the Stow boot.   Pediwear has them instock.  Or I can go through Trickers to specify my exact styling for almost twice the cost.  Has anyone had experience with ordering either through Trickers or Pediwear? Please advise.
post #2 of 17
Tricker's have been going for an awfully long time. (They are the oldest manufacturers, going back to the days when machinery and factories had not been invented). The produce solid, well made, no-nonsense shoes and are particular regarded for their heavy country shoes. They also make bespoke (machine made) shoes, starting from GBP 750.00. (I presume you will have to come to London, first for the measurements and second for a fitting).  I think they will also do stock-specials (you would have to contact them and ask), where they will make a particular design over a stock last in the leather, color and sole of your choice. When you phone the shop in London be gentle, nobody that work there is under the age of seventy: "Dad's Army". (That's a reference to a popular British television program, which you Yanks might not have seen.) I am not that well up on American makers, bit Tricker's is probably similar to Hart, Shaffner, Marx: a good, old established company, lots to appreciate, a great deal to respect but very little to fall in love with.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
How do they compasre to Edward Green or J M Weston<
post #4 of 17
Tricker's boots cost about half what a pair of Edward Green boots cost. You can expect greater refinement in EG shoes (no wonder with that difference in price). What is better, a plough horse, a riding horse or a race horse? It depends on the job.Tricker's produce that reliable working horse. It might be lacking the glamour of some other horses. But, by God, it's a jolly good worker. I'm not very familiar with J.M. Weston, therefore I cannot comment on them. But from what I have seen, they are maybe halfway between Tricker's and Edward Green. The best production method for heavy boots is "Veldtschoen", where the upper leather is turned to the outside (forming a flange) and stitched, thus preventing water to penetrate through the welt. Tricker's, as well as C & J, Grenson, Alfred Sargent, Cheaney (but not EG) offer some country models in this method. But I believe the "Stow" is standard welted with a storm welt. (Difficult to see on the site, I can be wrong). I'm afraid; I'm not into heavy country boots. I have just a special order with EG for a pair of "Halifax" boots. In the catalogue they are classed as country boots with rubber soles and last 505, the chunkiest of all EG lasts (but graceful and elegant when compared to the Tricker's last). But my boots will be dandified and smart town boots; they go on last 808, which is the nearest thing to a chisel toe. (They should be ready in January.)
post #5 of 17
Quote:
The best production method for heavy boots is "Veldtschoen", where the upper leather is turned to the outside (forming a flange) and stitched, thus preventing water to penetrate through the welt. Tricker's, as well as C & J, Grenson, Alfred Sargent, Cheaney (but not EG) offer some country models in this method. But I believe the "Stow" is standard welted with a storm welt. (Difficult to see on the site, I can be wrong).
FWIW, a previous version of the EG catalogue (the oblong one with the green cover) lists the Galway boot (high cap-toe derby boot) and the Dundee (a shoe version of the Galway) as being made in the Veldtshoen manner. I don't know if they still do this, but there it is.
Quote:
I'm afraid; I'm not into heavy country boots. I have just a special order with EG for a pair of "Halifax" boots. In the catalogue they are classed as country boots with rubber soles and last 505, the chunkiest of all EG lasts (but graceful and elegant when compared to the Tricker's last). But my boots will be dandified and smart town boots; they go on last 808, which is the nearest thing to a chisel toe. (They should be ready in January.)
I'm sure that they'll look great. A sort of half-boot version of the Dover, isn't it? What leather did you choose?
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
duplicate
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Bengal-Stripe: I am a very proud owner of the Halifax with storm welt and Medway soles in 505 last, black country calf. When I ordered them I spoke to Hilary Freeman (owner)about doing the 808 last. She recommended the 505 for my wide feet, but we agreed the 808 would be very classy. You'll enjoy them. They are a very classy and servicable boot. None too chuncky. The workmanship on the hand-stitched spilt toe is a true piece of work. JCusey: I also own the Galway . Not as classy as the Halifax. I do wear them in the field. Holland & Holland, when they first opened in NYC, did a version of the Galway and a brouged shoe they called the Churchill. I own the Churchill. An exceptional all-round shoe. The Dunhill shoe is similar without the broughing. The shoe is very nice. I am not sure if H&H still stocks the EG country shoes. Any of the country shoes by EG are very nice for a tweed suit, sport coat and flannels, jeans, or your shooting attire. I strongly recommend them to you City Slickers. They are nicer then the EG dress shoes; much more character. A smooth calf skin with double=leather soles would dress them up nicely. I have a Dover in Stag Suede. Yummy. The country calf skin (Scottish origins), which is a rolled pattern, is most servicable. They antique the leather. It hardly (if at all) scuffs. It softens well with age. A water resistent skin.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Bengal-Stripe: I am a very proud owner of the Halifax with storm welt and Medway soles in 505 last, black country calf. When I ordered them I spoke to Hilary Freeman (owner)about doing the 808 last.
What is Ms. Freeman the owner of (pardon my obtuseness)?
Quote:
The workmanship on the hand-stitched spilt toe is a true piece of work.
I'm a split-toe junkie. I just keep ordering them, from any number of manufacturers. My Dovers in Edwardian Antique on the 808 last have been on order now for almost 8 months. I'm getting a bit antsy.
Quote:
JCusey: I also own the Galway . Not as classy as the Halifax.
Certainly true, but I might be able to forgive myself if I tramped through mud in a pair of Galways. I doubt I could if I were wearing Halifaxes.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
JCusey: Hilary Freeman is the owner of EG. For spilt toe shoes check out the Derby Hunt with triple leather soles by J M Weston ($1000).  They are made from one piece of leather, except for the very top piece.  Chuncky yes, but very comfortable. The Halifax will do just as well in the field as the Galway.  They are no less servicable then the Galway, just more refined.  A little mud is that natural antique.  Much like a beautiful show bird or water dog.  They need to run free. Regarding the delay on your boots.  I found EG at times needs a pointed query and firm approach. They can be remiss on schedules.  Try Hilary@edwardgreen.com   She cares very much about customer satisfaction and will see to your order promptly.  The normal delivery time is 12-16 weeks.  Eight months suggests an oversight. Note that the shop is most likely closed until the new year.
post #10 of 17
I suppose it must be a very brave, or a very foolish man to drag $ 800+ boots through bramble bushes and mud puddles. (I once had a pair of velvet slippers. After many dollops of bolognaise sauce or toothpaste landing on the shoes, I decided against doing any sort of job in fancy footwear, particular those ones you cannot clean.) I believe I have met Hilary Freeman: attractive tall woman in her 40s or so. She always serves in the shop on the first day of the sale.  I realized she was not just casual labor, hired for the day and that she was higher up in the company, but I did not realize, she owns the whole caboodle. My "Halifax" will be in mahogany country calf with double leather soles, narrowly cut. Basically it is the boot version of the "Dover", which I have in a 606 last (Edwardian tan). I only hope, I do not have to wait for 8 month. jcusey - The EG sale starts this coming Friday (Jan 2nd). If you want to, I can mention your shoes to Ms Freeman and ask her to look into the matter. I believe from some previous post, you placed the order with a retailer and not EG directly.
post #11 of 17
Since the subject matter of this topic seems to have shifted from Trickers to EG, is there a better source of online information than their website? I see no referene to the Halifax or Galway, or any mention of specific lasts. I'd be interested in seeing pictures at the very least. Thank you.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Timelessrider: If you can (or anyone else) tell me how to load pictures onto this forum I'll provide some. I have tried posting form my c-drive. No success. Also search the web for pictures. There are some good Japanese postings. Or email EG and ask for a catalog. Bengal-strip: Does a country gentleman avoid mud puddles while driving his Range Rover? These boots are made for the field and with proper respectful care they do just fine. They are certainly not velvet slippers. But, these field boots are not suitable for bolognaise sauce either. I suspect toothpaste and some warm water would do them good after a day in the field. On a more series note, soil on leather or natural rubber boots will do harm if not cleaned off after use. I simply run warm water over my boots and wax thereafter. I supose heavy organic soils will stain. But if probably waxed.. not a big problem. However, Ms Freeman told me the classic Scottish shoe for the field are the Stag Suede Dovers. She told me to simply brush the the soil off. My fine boots are for the uplands. Rubber does better in the low lands. As for a fool, well who of us really needs EG shoes or boots. Some may consider one who spends hard-owned money on such a luxury a fool, perhaps. I am a style guy, who is also a professional environmental scientist with graduate level education in forest, plant, and soil sciences. I like good gear, and am not moved by the high-tech stuff. Take some comfort that I do not wear EG boots for the heavy duty stuff, for that I am wearing Whites Boots. (See their web page for very nice stuff).
post #13 of 17
jrh: To post a picture you need to have the image hosted on a server that will allow the image to be accessible via HTTP. There are any number of image hosting services available, free or otherwise - a google search will yield dozens. The free ones generally have resetrictions (individual image file size, total number of images images, etc.) Some people have servers at work that they can link to. Unfortunately I have no service provider recommendations in this area and no servers at my work place that are accessible from the outside world. Maybe one of the other members can chime in with their recommendations.
Quote:
Timelessrider: If you can (or anyone else) tell me how to load pictures onto this forum I'll provide some. I have tried posting form my c-drive. No success. Also search the web for pictures. There are some good Japanese postings. Or email EG and ask for a catalog.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Since the subject matter of this topic seems to have shifted from Trickers to EG, is there a better source of online information than their website? I see no referene to the Halifax or Galway, or any mention of specific lasts. I'd be interested in seeing pictures at the very least.
Jun Kuwana's Cobbler's Website has pictures of a number of different Green models, both old and new, including two versions of the Halifax. You can find scans of all or most of the models in EG's current catalogue on this other Japanese website here. I got my copy of the Green catalogue by sending an e-mail request to the address listed on the website. You could also request one from one of Green's US retailers.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Jun Kuwana's Cobbler's Website has pictures of a number of different Green models, both old and new, including two versions of the Halifax.
Speaking of Jun Kuwana, it looks like he met with an Edward Green representative about ordering bepoke EGs. It will be interesting to see what he decided on.
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