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Drape tutorial? - Page 3

post #31 of 343


Juxtaposing these jackets is interesting...keeping in mind the one on the left is finished and the product of J's love and inclination, and the one at the right is an experiment at only the fitting stage (also the differences in fabric and buttoning.)

He's going to hate hearing this, but I think that if the drape in the chest adds weight or substance, that visual weight is giving him better balance between his upper body and hips. If he can shape the waist more like in his finished jacket, well, I think it will end up being a pretty damn good first attempt at a softer, drapier cut.

- B
post #32 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
That places you in good company.


- B


Well, "advanced" company, anyway.
post #33 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Your test coat is looking FANTASTIC. If you can get it to fit you like a bit closer to the way it fits the dummy, it is a remarkable first attempt.

Bravo.


File that one under "N."
post #34 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
File that one under "N."

Nipple?


- B
post #35 of 343
Say "NO" to "DRAP"!
post #36 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by forex View Post
Say "NO" to "DRAP"!

"Drap is crap, drap is crap!"

- B
post #37 of 343
I agree. As with so many things drape or no drape is a matter of personal preference and how one might want to be seen. I really do think the cut, when well executed, can add substance in all the right places. Wasn't that what Scholte wanted? It wasn't just a matter of comfort, but of giving strength. A clean cut reveals quite a bit and does not seem to add any strength. If anything, it could be said to take it away, on certain figures, anyway. I like the coat on the right much more than the coat on the left. I now I'd be much more comfortable wearing it, and I use 'comfortable' in a very general sense, i.e. psychological as well as physical.
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Juxtaposing these jackets is interesting...keeping in mind the one on the left is finished and the product of J's love and inclination, and the one at the right is an experiment at only the fitting stage (also the differences in fabric and buttoning.) He's going to hate hearing this, but I think that if the drape in the chest adds weight or substance, that visual weight is giving him better balance between his upper body and hips. If he can shape the waist more like in his finished jacket, well, I think it will end up being a pretty damn good first attempt at a softer, drapier cut. - B
post #38 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by triniboy27 View Post
This jacket looks spectacular.



Interestingly enough, I've noticed drapesque characteristics on about 3 or 4 of my sportcoats, all of which are RTW and none of which were tried on before purchasing.

What a nice jacket. I have seen one with a similar cut from Attolini in the thread Brioni and Attolini.
post #39 of 343
Do keep in mind that Jeffreyd is trying to follow Archibald A. Whife to the letter. Whife was a West End cutter, whose career ran contemporary to that of Scholte's. The pattern and instructions I got J come from a 1949 three volume textbook on West End tailoring:



This is as authoritative as it gets. The addition of drape to chest through to waist, and the lengthening of the coat are all done as per Whife's instructions.
post #40 of 343
Here is an interesting commentary on drape from Flusser. Take a look 2:15 into this interview:

http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/2213

I quote:

"Drape....it's more the American style actually..."
post #41 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
Here is an interesting commentary on drape from Flusser. Take a look 2:15 into this interview:

http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/2213

I quote:

"Drape....it's more the American style actually..."



This is very important to you, isn't it?

I can tell you with absolute certainty that if you asked Flusser if "drape" was originally American, he would say "No." It's true that it has been popular with Americans pretty much from the beginning, but that is something else.

Drape is not American, and it is not the Sack. Give it up.
post #42 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I got sick of popcorn
I know what you mean
post #43 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
I know what you mean



Did you just make this? :O
post #44 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post

I much prefer the drape jacket, not that anything is wrong with the other one--it just seems a bit long and closed up top. The clean jacket is just a bit too 'tense' for me.
post #45 of 343
Sack coat is just the traditional generic American English term for a lounge coat. Such usage is found in all cutting manuals I own from the 1860s-1950s. The term "sack coat" is not even American. It is the older term for a "lounge coat" in British English, just like the term "cutaway" is an older, outdated British English terms for a "morning coat".

There is even this curious use of the term in Apparel Arts:

In business suits there are two types of construction, one the so-called lounge model which features ease of line and rougher fabrics, the other the sack jacket which is built along: body tracing lines and is best adapted to the smoother cloths. With the present vogue for rough suitings, the lounge model is in the ascendant.

The usage of the term "lounge coat" in older American texts on cutting and tailoring is exceedingly rare.

From:

http://thelondonlounge.net/gl/forum/...pic.php?t=6862

In terms of the origin of the drape cut this is what Whife states:



It is interesting that this casts doubt on the usual claim that the drape cut in English tailoring had Continental origins, it being supposedly introduced by the Dutchman Scholte.
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