or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying fabric online
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buying fabric online - Page 2

post #16 of 78
Please read previous edifying posts about distinctions between alterations tailors and bespoke tailors, and whom should be consulted regarding cloth. Grayson
post #17 of 78
Quote:
Quote:
(johnnynorman3 @ April 22 2005,17:01) I personally don't consider the type of person I described to be a tailor, which is why I put the word in quotation marks.  But I think most people consider anyone who can hem pants to be a tailor, and thus place unwarranted faith in their knowledge sartorial.   Hey, I can hem pants -- maybe I should call myself a tailor.
That type of person is called an "Alterations Tailor"... according to A&S and others...
An alterations tailor is the person who corrects others' mistakes, which is not always an easy thing to do.
post #18 of 78
Quote:
Quote:
(T4phage @ April 22 2005,08:17)
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnynorman3,April 22 2005,17:01
I personally don't consider the type of person I described to be a tailor, which is why I put the word in quotation marks.  But I think most people consider anyone who can hem pants to be a tailor, and thus place unwarranted faith in their knowledge sartorial.   Hey, I can hem pants -- maybe I should call myself a tailor.
That type of person is called an "Alterations Tailor"... according to A&S and others...
An alterations tailor is the person who corrects others' mistakes, which is not always an easy thing to do.
True to some extent. Here is Kilgour's definition: "Alterations : Most tailoring firms operate piece-work (q.v.) payment systems with Tailor their tailors . Consequently a coatmaker's work is finished sometime before the garment is actually ready for delivery to the customer. Apart from the finishing stage, it is usually the case that minor adjustments to the fit of the garment will be needed to achieve perfection. For these final touches the cutter will use an alteration tailor. Alteration tailors are highly skilled since they alter the work of other tailors. Because of this they are normally housed separately from their colleagues" Yes, they alter other's work... but they do not create.
post #19 of 78
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by offshore observer,April 22 2005,17:56
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage,April 22 2005,08:17
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnynorman3,April 22 2005,17:01
I personally don't consider the type of person I described to be a tailor, which is why I put the word in quotation marks.  But I think most people consider anyone who can hem pants to be a tailor, and thus place unwarranted faith in their knowledge sartorial.   Hey, I can hem pants -- maybe I should call myself a tailor.
That type of person is called an "Alterations Tailor"... according to A&S and others...
An alterations tailor is the person who corrects others' mistakes, which is not always an easy thing to do.
True to some extent.  Here is Kilgour's definition: "Alterations : Most tailoring firms operate piece-work (q.v.) payment systems with Tailor their tailors . Consequently a coatmaker's work is finished sometime before the garment is actually ready for delivery to the customer. Apart from the finishing stage, it is usually the case that minor adjustments to the fit of the garment will be needed to achieve perfection. For these final touches the cutter will use an alteration tailor. Alteration tailors are highly skilled since they alter the work of other tailors. Because of this they are normally housed separately from their colleagues" Yes, they alter other's work... but they do not create.
If someone can only hem trousers and nothing more, then I'm not sure what I'd call them...perhaps "drycleaners"?
post #20 of 78
One other advantage of establishing a friendly rapport with your tailor, in allowing him to buy cloth on your behalf, is that you become privy to exclusive finds that only the tailors  have access to from the distributors.  Case in point, one tailor with whom I have a good relationship was just presented with some very hard-to-find vintage cloth and especially rare Golden Bale patterns by the distributor, and I was given first crack at the cloth, available only in very small, limited quantities.  I would never have had such access unless through my friendly tailor. Grayson
post #21 of 78
Presented with the opportunity to source quality tweeds directly and have them sewn by someone that's made dozens of garments for me, in a known silhouette, I see no reason not to eliminate the retail markup. In my case, the CMT provider could destroy one batch of cloth for every one sewn successfully and I'd still be way ahead. I agree that the circumstances are unusual.
post #22 of 78
Quote:
Presented with the opportunity to source quality tweeds directly and have them sewn by someone that's made dozens of garments for me, in a known silhouette, I see no reason not to eliminate the retail markup.
I agree completely in this instance. And, perhaps, the real incentive isn't saving the few dollars of retail markup, but the quality of the cloth and certainty of make?
post #23 of 78
In an attempt to return to the original thread topic, I ask if someone here knowledgeable of fabrics could suggest a source for the 10.5 oz Irish linen. Preferably with color choices that include a "dirty" white. Possibly a source that is available online - so that I do not have to visit NYC to have a personal conversation with the proprietor. And, while I'm wishing, one with an affordable price.
post #24 of 78
Quote:
If someone can only hem trousers and nothing more, then I'm not sure what I'd call them...perhaps "drycleaners"?
No, you must also be proficient at destroying shirts and pressing coat lapels flat in order to achieve that exalted title.
post #25 of 78
For years, the Rolls Royce of Irish linen was from Spencer Bryson, in Dublin, however I'm not certain if they're still in business. W. Bill in the UK offers superb Irish linen, as well as a distributor out of Italy called Drapers. Hope this helps. Grayson
post #26 of 78
Quote:
For years, the Rolls Royce of Irish linen was from Spencer Bryson, in Dublin, however I'm not certain if they're still in business.  W. Bill in the UK offers superb Irish linen, as well as a distributor out of Italy called Drapers.  Hope this helps. Grayson
Grayson, Thank you for the help. I found that company within the last few days. It is now part of another group - name now escapes me. Little information available about them on the WWW - they puffed their quality and that was about it. Nothing for retailer or sourcing contact, IIRC. So, I surfed away. I will have to try to find it again and look more thoroughly.
post #27 of 78
Charley, this organization might be of assistance, too... Irish Linen Guild 028 9268 9999 Fax 028 9268 9968 Email info@irishlinen.co.uk Grayson
post #28 of 78
marc For years, the Rolls Royce of Irish linen was from Spencer Bryson, in Dublin, however I'm not certain if they're still in business. W. Bill in the UK offers superb Irish linen, as well as a distributor out of Italy called Drapers. Hope this helps. Grayson Spencer Bryson, still in business, use them myself. but if you`re looking for linen hankerchiefs, The Irish Linen Shop, LONDON The Irish Linen Shop 35/36 Burlington Arcade Piccadilly London W1 T 020 7493 8949
post #29 of 78
grayson, if I wanted a suit for the summer with linen in a blend, what would you recommend? I'll be in Paris for this. thanks in advance
post #30 of 78
Quote:
if I wanted a suit for the summer with linen in a blend, what would you recommend? I'll be in Paris for this.
I'm drawing a blank on any kind of respected linen blend for suits, etc. I'm not even sure what would be blended with linen, except, possibly cotton, but I would only recommend pure linen. Linen/cotton for shirts, perhaps. Grayson
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying fabric online