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Dinner at Per Se - Suit or Blazer? - Page 28

post #406 of 427
Master of the Universe FTW.

Oldest wine I have ever had from a restaurant cellar was a 1970 Haut Brion. I had a 1929 Latour in the cellar (literally; he has a dining table in there) at a family friend's once. That's the oldest wine I ever drunk, I think. My father and that same friend and two other guys once shared a magnum of (pre-phyloxera) 1875 Lafite.
post #407 of 427
BTW, GDL, there was no menu at BH@SBs Friday night. Just a choice between a 5-course and 6-course menu, and the option to exclude certain ingredients.
post #408 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The closest type of thing like this for me in a restaurant was getting a bottle of 1795 madeira (I did not buy...thank the Gods...but I did drink...thank them again.) It was pretty memorable...nothing extraordinary on the palate, but the perfume was really strong...other tables could smell it. It was this deep, dark orange.

Same evening featured an 1870s cognac.

I'm trying to remember if our table got a speech about risks, but I honestly do not recall any disclaimers.


- B


If the bottle is bad, they eat the cost, but ONLY if the sommelier agrees it's bad. That's part of the reason why most restaurants don't keep insanely priced wines. Although, there are also insurance policies according to a sommelier I spoke to about this "What if." I think Bastide in LA had a $90k bottle of wine which was from Pytka's personal collection, but was obviously for sale if anyone wanted it.
post #409 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Oh believe me, I've been trying many many times to reconsider. Some girls threatened to leave me, some guys threatened to beat me, some clients threatened to fire me (one of them laughing at me when he was ordering 1986 Cheval Blanc for lunch). In the end, I just hate that thing - must be an allergy I guess. Some very dry white wines I can stand, but I've never had a sip of red wine that didn't make me cringe.

GDL,

Per Se had/has a non alcoholic pairing with their dinner. That might be worth a try if you really need to avoid wine.

JP
post #410 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Yum, yum, yum...in the end, though, it's China and France, then everyone else.

- B

Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
At least somebody agrees with me. Those two cuisines stand head and shoulders above everything else.

But dessert is Chinese's weakest link. It's behind the French, Italian, Austrian and even the German.

Don't you hate it when your meal starts a bang, keeps getting better and better, and then ends with a whimper?
post #411 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart View Post
But dessert is Chinese's weakest link. It's behind the French, Italian, Austrian and even the German.

Don't you hate it when your meal starts a bang, keeps getting better and better, and then ends with a whimper?
I love salt and fat, but I'm not so into sweet. Chinese suits me well.
post #412 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart View Post
But dessert is Chinese's weakest link. It's behind the French, Italian, Austrian and even the German.

The Chinese lead in one area of dessert.



Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart View Post
you hate it when your meal starts a bang, keeps getting better and better, and then ends with a whimper?

Are you referring to the check? That is always a downer.


- B
post #413 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The Chinese lead in one area of dessert.




- B

Fortune cookie is a pure American invention. There's no such thing as fortune cookie outside North America.

Quote:
Are you referring to the check? That is always a downer.

There's usually no surprise with the check for a Chinese meal.
post #414 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Master of the Universe FTW. Oldest wine I have ever had from a restaurant cellar was a 1970 Haut Brion. I had a 1929 Latour in the cellar (literally; he has a dining table in there) at a family friend's once. That's the oldest wine I ever drunk, I think. My father and that same friend and two other guys once shared a magnum of (pre-phyloxera) 1875 Lafite.
I have two cases of 1983 Cheval Blanc that has turned and will have to all be thrown out. Fuck!!! Lesson is to drink the stuff and not let it sit there.
post #415 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
I have two cases of 1983 Cheval Blanc that has turned and will have to all be thrown out. Fuck!!! Lesson is to drink the stuff and not let it sit there.

Is there any way to know which wines can age for how long, without going through trial and error?
Cause this makes me sad.

How do you guys have this self control? I could barely age my cigars more than a month, let alone years and years.
post #416 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
I have two cases of 1983 Cheval Blanc that has turned and will have to all be thrown out. Fuck!!! Lesson is to drink the stuff and not let it sit there.
That is really surprising. '83s were not stellar in SE, but I would have thought plenty good enough to hold on 25 years.

I had some Figeac from the year, but I drank it all eons ago. However, if I had Cheval, I would have held it longer.
post #417 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Is there any way to know which wines can age for how long, without going through trial and error?
Cause this makes me sad.

Basically, you guess based on what you know about the property and the vintage. So an ideal combination for long term aging would be a warhorse wine like Latour in a blockbuster year like 2005 or 2000.
post #418 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimslade View Post
BTW, GDL, there was no menu at BH@SBs Friday night. Just a choice between a 5-course and 6-course menu, and the option to exclude certain ingredients.

During the winter months they dont have a traditional menu, they offer only a 5 course tasting or the Farmers Feast which I believe is 9 courses. At other times of the year they have a regular ala carte menu plus the option to do a tasting.
post #419 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimslade View Post
BTW, GDL, there was no menu at BH@SBs Friday night. Just a choice between a 5-course and 6-course menu, and the option to exclude certain ingredients.

Yes, I believe that's how it was when I went for lunch - but I thought there was also a carte for dinner... So was the Berkshire pig/pork belly dish anywhere on either of the tasting menus?
post #420 of 427
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Yes, I believe that's how it was when I went for lunch - but I thought there was also a carte for dinner... So was the Berkshire pig/pork belly dish anywhere on either of the tasting menus?

Yes, we had berkshire pork belly on the second to last savory course. By the time the steak came for the last course, we were already done-for. As Axelman said, it may be a seasonal thing. The meal was terrific, and all but one of the wines were great too. The one thing I missed and wanted was the venison.
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