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Stolen violin

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld....912.htm (use bugmenot.com to circumvent password/login issue) My violin was stolen in january along with a fairly valuable bow, but this girl has really gotten cleaned out.
post #2 of 22
PHV - Have you ever heard of the Hawthorne bow? David Hawthorne is an old friend of mine and another violinist I know claimed they were famous (in certain circles I imagine).
post #3 of 22
Quote:
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld....912.htm (use bugmenot.com to circumvent password/login issue) My violin was stolen in january along with a fairly valuable bow, but this girl has really gotten cleaned out.
just out of curiosity, how much can a good bow run?
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Quote:
(PHV @ April 20 2005,18:22) http://www.mercurynews.com/mld....912.htm (use bugmenot.com to circumvent password/login issue) My violin was stolen in january along with a fairly valuable bow, but this girl has really gotten cleaned out.
just out of curiosity, how much can a good bow run?
Friend of mine plunked down 60 grand for a Tourte, and that was ten years ago. It's probably much more now. koji
post #5 of 22
I was blown away that someone who owns an $850K violin and bow would loan it out to a kid. I have heard that the owner is fairly wealthy and owns other violins that he has loaned out to other young musicians in order to give them access to great instruments. I was also blown away that someone entrusted with that valuable of an instrument would leave it on the seat of their car in a grocery store parking lot. I suppose that happens, though. Remember last year when the principal cellist for the LA Philharmonic had a $3.5MM Stradivarius stolen? He left it on his front porch and went inside for the night. The cello was later found in an alley by a woman who was going to have her boyfriend cut it apart and turn it into a CD cabinet, but heard about the theft before doing it.
post #6 of 22
...not to mention the story when Yo-Mama forgot his axe in a cab.... koji
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I was blown away that someone who owns an $850K violin and bow would loan it out to a kid.  I have heard that the owner is fairly wealthy and owns other violins that he has loaned out to other young musicians in order to give them access to great instruments. I was also blown away that someone entrusted with that valuable of an instrument would leave it on the seat of their car in a grocery store parking lot.  I suppose that happens, though. Remember last year when the principal cellist for the LA Philharmonic had a $3.5MM Stradivarius stolen?  He left it on his front porch and went inside for the night.  The cello was later found in an alley by a woman who was going to have her boyfriend cut it apart and turn it into a CD cabinet, but heard about the theft before doing it.
My teacher's daughter has been lowned two Strads, and a Guarneri. That's a total of like 6 million dollars. Good players who win competitions get stuff on loan all the time. My bow right now is worth about $12,000 US. But as Koji said, bows can go way up. $60,000 is pretty cheap for a Tourte, but that of course was a while ago. Pecatte's will run you about $60,000 and there are tons between $20,000 and that.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
PHV - Have you ever heard of the Hawthorne bow?  David Hawthorne is an old friend of mine and another violinist I know claimed they were famous (in certain circles I imagine).
He's a modern maker. Probably a good bow, but won't be anything valuable until after he's dead and gone. That and the fact that he isn't french will probably hamper its value. That is not to say that they are not great bows. I'll ask around about them. Is he by any chance based in the north east?
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Quote:
(retronotmetro @ April 21 2005,10:57) I was blown away that someone who owns an $850K violin and bow would loan it out to a kid.  I have heard that the owner is fairly wealthy and owns other violins that he has loaned out to other young musicians in order to give them access to great instruments. I was also blown away that someone entrusted with that valuable of an instrument would leave it on the seat of their car in a grocery store parking lot.  I suppose that happens, though. Remember last year when the principal cellist for the LA Philharmonic had a $3.5MM Stradivarius stolen?  He left it on his front porch and went inside for the night.  The cello was later found in an alley by a woman who was going to have her boyfriend cut it apart and turn it into a CD cabinet, but heard about the theft before doing it.
My teacher's daughter has been lowned two Strads, and a Guarneri. That's a total of like 6 million dollars. Good players who win competitions get stuff on loan all the time. My bow right now is worth about $12,000 US. But as Koji said, bows can go way up. $60,000 is pretty cheap for a Tourte, but that of course was a while ago. Pecatte's will run you about $60,000 and there are tons between $20,000 and that.
I am sorry that I know so little about this, but please induldge me - what is the bow made of? it looks like cords and 3 pieces of wood. is the value in the quality of the raw products, in the workmanship? is there that much difference in quality of sound relating to the bow, or is it more an issue of aesthetics, rarity and/or comfort of use?
post #10 of 22
Quote:
He's a modern maker. Probably a good bow, but won't be anything valuable until after he's dead and gone. That and the fact that he isn't french will probably hamper its value. That is not to say that they are not great bows. I'll ask around about them. Is he by any chance based in the north east?
Yeah - he's in Boston.
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PHV,April 21 2005,11:55
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro,April 21 2005,10:57
I was blown away that someone who owns an $850K violin and bow would loan it out to a kid.  I have heard that the owner is fairly wealthy and owns other violins that he has loaned out to other young musicians in order to give them access to great instruments. I was also blown away that someone entrusted with that valuable of an instrument would leave it on the seat of their car in a grocery store parking lot.  I suppose that happens, though. Remember last year when the principal cellist for the LA Philharmonic had a $3.5MM Stradivarius stolen?  He left it on his front porch and went inside for the night.  The cello was later found in an alley by a woman who was going to have her boyfriend cut it apart and turn it into a CD cabinet, but heard about the theft before doing it.
My teacher's daughter has been lowned two Strads, and a Guarneri. That's a total of like 6 million dollars. Good players who win competitions get stuff on loan all the time. My bow right now is worth about $12,000 US. But as Koji said, bows can go way up. $60,000 is pretty cheap for a Tourte, but that of course was a while ago. Pecatte's will run you about $60,000 and there are tons between $20,000 and that.
I am sorry that I know so little about this, but please induldge  me - what is the bow made of? it looks like cords and 3 pieces of wood. is the value in the quality of the raw products, in the workmanship? is there that much difference in quality of sound relating to the bow, or is it more an issue of aesthetics, rarity and/or comfort of use?
The finest bows are made of pernambuco. The "frog" (or perhaps the hilt) are usually made of fine ebony, or in some rare cases, genuine tortoise shell, or ivory. Most mountings are either in silver or gold (French bowmakers make every 30th bow in gold). Octagonal sticks are more valuable, and round sticks are often more preffered as playing tools. The value comes from a lot of things. A fine bow is a tremendous achievement in craftsmanship and engineering. It is highly balanced, and in its points of instability, one can still coax an even stroke (for spicatto and sautille strokes). A fine bow makes a massive difference in sound over a mediocre bow. So, it is a combination of all the things you mention. The "cords" that you are talking about are horsehairs, about 180 of them. The finest bows are French by makers such as Tourte, Pecatte, Sartory, Voirin, Ouchard, Vuillaume etc... there are valuable bows from other countries, some German and English bows can fetch a good price.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
...not to mention the story when Yo-Mama forgot his axe in a cab.... koji
HAHAH... oh man. I remember as a kid thinking that that guy (actually I thought it was a woman) must be a rap star.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Quote:
(globetrotter @ April 21 2005,12:02)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PHV,April 21 2005,11:55
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro,April 21 2005,10:57
I was blown away that someone who owns an $850K violin and bow would loan it out to a kid.  I have heard that the owner is fairly wealthy and owns other violins that he has loaned out to other young musicians in order to give them access to great instruments. I was also blown away that someone entrusted with that valuable of an instrument would leave it on the seat of their car in a grocery store parking lot.  I suppose that happens, though. Remember last year when the principal cellist for the LA Philharmonic had a $3.5MM Stradivarius stolen?  He left it on his front porch and went inside for the night.  The cello was later found in an alley by a woman who was going to have her boyfriend cut it apart and turn it into a CD cabinet, but heard about the theft before doing it.
My teacher's daughter has been lowned two Strads, and a Guarneri. That's a total of like 6 million dollars. Good players who win competitions get stuff on loan all the time. My bow right now is worth about $12,000 US. But as Koji said, bows can go way up. $60,000 is pretty cheap for a Tourte, but that of course was a while ago. Pecatte's will run you about $60,000 and there are tons between $20,000 and that.
I am sorry that I know so little about this, but please induldge  me - what is the bow made of? it looks like cords and 3 pieces of wood. is the value in the quality of the raw products, in the workmanship? is there that much difference in quality of sound relating to the bow, or is it more an issue of aesthetics, rarity and/or comfort of use?
The finest bows are made of pernambuco. The "frog" (or perhaps the hilt) are usually made of fine ebony, or in some rare cases, genuine tortoise shell, or ivory. Most mountings are either in silver or gold (French bowmakers make every 30th bow in gold). Octagonal sticks are more valuable, and round sticks are often more preffered as playing tools. The value comes from a lot of things. A fine bow is a tremendous achievement in craftsmanship and engineering. It is highly balanced, and in its points of instability, one can still coax an even stroke (for spicatto and sautille strokes). A fine bow makes a massive difference in sound over a mediocre bow. So, it is a combination of all the things you mention. The "cords" that you are talking about are horsehairs, about 180 of them. The finest bows are French by makers such as Tourte, Pecatte, Sartory, Voirin, Ouchard, Vuillaume etc... there are valuable bows from other countries, some German and English bows can fetch a good price.
thanks
post #14 of 22
I think we now know the reason why Koji choose the piano: when is the last time someone you read on the news that someone had their Steinway grand stolen from the passenger seat of their car? Jon.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
I think we now know the reason why Koji choose the piano: when is the last time someone you read on the news that someone had their Steinway grand stolen from the passenger seat of their car?
Along those lines, I believe it was Steve Martin who first said: "Here's a phrase you never hear: hand me that piano." Re: the violin loss; that's why I majored in Voice.
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