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dry cleaning a tie

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Okay so I spilled on a brand new tie the other day and took it to the dry cleaners asap. They managed to get the stain out but flattened the tie flatter than a damn pancake. It was pressed so hard the loop in the back made an impression on the front, as did just the edges of the silk and lining. Luckily it was a SYMS purchase so I'm not out much if it never looks like it did orginally. But I'm pissed still. What do I say to a dry cleaner when I take a tie to them? Especially if I've not been there before. I had never taken these guys a tie before and given the stain ignored my misgivings over how they treated some shirts before. In the past I have asked a dry cleaner to be careful and not press the tie. I basically was yelled at for having the imputence to tell them how to do their job. Granted, I don't want anyone telling me how to do my job, but well, you know, sometimes it seems appropriate. Any advice? cheers, bob
post #2 of 17
The general rule is "don't take a tie to the dry cleaners, period." Most dry cleaners will destroy ties. If your cleaners react badly to a simple request, find another one who has an actual customer service ethic. A tie should never be pressed in its assembled and folded shape, but some cleaners either don't know that or are not equipped to handle the job. I know tiecrafters in NY is supposed to be able to handle tie cleaning and pressing work properly, and they accept mail order work. I haven't used them but am positive that others on the board have done so.
post #3 of 17
Tiecrafters is a godsend.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Tiecrafters is a godsend.
Amen to that.
post #5 of 17
Steam it - that will get the creases out. Next time, no dry cleaners, pm me and I'll help, or send it to me and I'll see what I can do with it.
post #6 of 17
I had a Zegna tie with a slightly soiled spot where the knot is tied and took it into a local dry cleaner. I was willing to risk it as I don't have much in the tie. The good news is they got the smudge out and the silk looks great, not overly pressed either. The bad news is they somehow screwed up the lining while cleaning it. I'm debating whether to send it to Tiecrafters, but it's unwearable now. If you value a tie, don't take it to the dry cleaner.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
I'm debating whether to send it to Tiecrafters, but it's unwearable now. If you value a tie, don't take it to the dry cleaner.
Alan, Tiecrafters does a great job in relining ties ($17.00). Mine curl up around the edges after a while. They put a much thicker lining in the tie than the original Hermes lining and they make the tie usable.
post #8 of 17
I've had a tie cleaned at my regular cleaners with pretty good results, but I think I was lucky and I probably won't chance it again. My wife, however, accidentally dropped a different tie off at another cleaner's, and they actually used (this is no joke) a wire brush to scrub out the vanilla ice cream. I absolutely, positively could not believe they could be so stupid. Then again, this is the same firm whose alterations department routinely screws up hem jobs by making the legs shockingly uneven. This is also the same firm that lost ten suit pants of my friend's but still had the jackets; they insisted they knew nothing about the trousers until a lawyer was brought into the action. They've replaced nice (and sometimes antique) MOP buttons with cheap plastic ones and insisted that the plastic ones were what originally came on the garment...again, until lawyers were notified. All of these stories, by the way, happened to people I know well. I've also heard many stories by those I know less well and so feel I shouldn't pass them along, though I have no reason not to believe them as they've all been characteristic of the things that have happened to me and my friends.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
I've had a tie cleaned at my regular cleaners with pretty good results, but I think I was lucky and I probably won't chance it again. My wife, however, accidentally dropped a different tie off at another cleaner's, and they actually used (this is no joke) a wire brush to scrub out the vanilla ice cream. I absolutely, positively could not believe they could be so stupid. Then again, this is the same firm whose alterations department routinely screws up hem jobs by making the legs shockingly uneven. This is also the same firm that lost ten suit pants of my friend's but still had the jackets; they insisted they knew nothing about the trousers until a lawyer was brought into the action. They've replaced nice (and sometimes antique) MOP buttons with cheap plastic ones and insisted that the plastic ones were what originally came on the garment...again, until lawyers were notified. All of these stories, by the way, happened to people I know well. I've also heard many stories by those I know less well and so feel I shouldn't pass them along, though I have no reason not to believe them as they've all been characteristic of the things that have happened to me and my friends.
Umm, that's got to a new one for the lawyer involved -- arguing over whether MOP buttons should be replaced with the same....
post #10 of 17
Try a men's facial cleaner, like witch-hazel based stuff sold in men's fragrances. Dap a little with a cotton ball. Usually takes out small spots. If not, end game.
post #11 of 17
"Umm, that's got to a new one for the lawyer involved -- arguing over whether MOP buttons should be replaced with the same...." In the case of the antique buttons, they "found" the originals right away. I'm not sure about the other case(s).
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Quote:
(AlanC @ April 18 2005,12:59) I'm debating whether to send it to Tiecrafters, but it's unwearable now. If you value a tie, don't take it to the dry cleaner.
Alan, Tiecrafters does a great job in relining ties ($17.00). Mine curl up around the edges after a while. They put a much thicker lining in the tie than the original Hermes lining and they make the tie usable.
I've been considering giving Tie Crafters a try. I may just do it just to see how it goes.
post #13 of 17
Carlo, what do you mean "steaming a tie" ? Will it reverse to its previous "fullness"?
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Carlo, what do you mean "steaming a tie" ? Will it reverse to its previous "fullness"?
Use a steamer and most if not all the fullness should come back. I've used to steam to great effect on wrinkled and crushed ties. It's remarkable what it can do. (Sorry, I'm not Carlo, but I'm better lookin' . )
post #15 of 17
Quote:
I've had a tie cleaned at my regular cleaners with pretty good results, but I think I was lucky and I probably won't chance it again. My wife, however, accidentally dropped a different tie off at another cleaner's, and they actually used (this is no joke) a wire brush to scrub out the vanilla ice cream. I absolutely, positively could not believe they could be so stupid. Then again, this is the same firm whose alterations department routinely screws up hem jobs by making the legs shockingly uneven. This is also the same firm that lost ten suit pants of my friend's but still had the jackets; they insisted they knew nothing about the trousers until a lawyer was brought into the action. They've replaced nice (and sometimes antique) MOP buttons with cheap plastic ones and insisted that the plastic ones were what originally came on the garment...again, until lawyers were notified. All of these stories, by the way, happened to people I know well. I've also heard many stories by those I know less well and so feel I shouldn't pass them along, though I have no reason not to believe them as they've all been characteristic of the things that have happened to me and my friends.
Wow, they'd actually go to the trouble to take the MOP buttons? I've had a few problems with some cleaners. I've had success by mail with French Hand Laundry in Pasadena.
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