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The no high-fructose corn syrup diet...

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Anyone else make a point not to eat anything with high-fructose corn syrup or corn syrup in general?
post #2 of 78
I try to stay away, but the past few months I've been all 'who gives a shit?'

I def steer away from the sodas with this in it; I only really like dr. pepper so I get "Dublin" Dr. Pepper smuggled up from Texas; it is the last bottler of Dr. Pepper that only uses cane sugar.
post #3 of 78
I simply started eating only basic things that I prepared myself. There's too many bullshit scapegoats for general poor health...
post #4 of 78
i have like 1 glass of soda a year, but never have HFCS besides then.
post #5 of 78
I try to eat healthy and elimininate all processed foods from my diet, but as a bartender I just can't resist the free Red Bulls and fountain cokes.
post #6 of 78
I'm aware that it's not good, avoid it as much as possible, but there are some tasty foods that have it in there, so I occassionally ignore the fact that it's bad.
post #7 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kas View Post
I try to eat healthy and elimininate all processed foods from my diet, but as a bartender I just can't resist the free Red Bulls and fountain cokes.

Red bull is sweetened with sugar.
post #8 of 78
What's the deal with HFCS? I can't find any journal articles with any good information.

Found this though: Sounds pretty cool:

Sucrose is composed of glucose and fructose. When sugar is given to rats in high amounts, the rats develop multiple health problems, especially when the rats were deficient in certain nutrients, such as copper. The researchers wanted to know whether it was the fructose or the glucose moiety that was causing the problems. So they repeated their studies with two groups of rats, one given high amounts of glucose and one given high amounts of fructose. The glucose group was unaffected but the fructose group had disastrous results. The male rats did not reach adulthood. They had anemia, high cholesterol and heart hypertrophy--that means that their hearts enlarged until they exploded. They also had delayed testicular development. Dr. Field explains that fructose in combination with copper deficiency in the growing animal interferes with collagen production. (Copper deficiency, by the way, is widespread in America.) In a nutshell, the little bodies of the rats just fell apart. The females were not so affected, but they were unable to produce live young.
post #9 of 78
HFCS is 55% fructose and 45% glucose. Sucrose (table sugar) is 50%/50%.

And those rats are injected with amounts of sugar so massive it'd be next to impossible to actually consume that amount of sugar without feeling ill and losing appetite.
post #10 of 78
I don't drink anything like soda, sweetened juices (like cranberry), or teas. Cup of coffee in the morning, and then it's water all day long. I can't remember the last time I had soda.
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
HFCS is 55% fructose and 45% glucose. Sucrose (table sugar) is 50%/50%. And those rats are injected with amounts of sugar so massive it'd be next to impossible to actually consume that amount of sugar without feeling ill and losing appetite.
Wikipedia says this: The most common types of high-fructose corn syrup are: HFCS 90 (mostly for making HFCS 55), approximately 90% fructose and 10% glucose; HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks), approximately 55% fructose and 45% glucose; and HFCS 42 (used in most foods and baked goods), approximately 42% fructose and 58% glucose.[3] Whether it's healthy or not, the cane and honey sweetened colas that I had in NZ several years ago tasted much better than coke.
post #11 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamish5178 View Post
Wikipedia says this: The most common types of high-fructose corn syrup are: HFCS 90 (mostly for making HFCS 55), approximately 90% fructose and 10% glucose; HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks), approximately 55% fructose and 45% glucose; and HFCS 42 (used in most foods and baked goods), approximately 42% fructose and 58% glucose.[3] Whether it's healthy or not, the cane and honey sweetened colas that I had in NZ several years ago tasted much better than coke.
HFCS 90 is used industrially. I don't think it's ever directly used in food.
post #12 of 78
I've avoided it for years. It's more of an avoidance of sugar than HFCS in particular, and it gets me reading nutrition and ingredient labels as well. I think that's the much more important part. Companies put sugar in lots of strange things like pasta sauce and ketchup, so reading the labels for that stuff helps me find the ketchup that usually tastes better anyway. It's more of an awareness-raising thing for me. That, and I detest sweetened hamburger buns. Yuck.
post #13 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by hi-val View Post
I've avoided it for years. It's more of an avoidance of sugar than HFCS in particular, and it gets me reading nutrition and ingredient labels as well. I think that's the much more important part. Companies put sugar in lots of strange things like pasta sauce and ketchup, so reading the labels for that stuff helps me find the ketchup that usually tastes better anyway. It's more of an awareness-raising thing for me. That, and I detest sweetened hamburger buns. Yuck.
Sugar is used in pasta sauces, breads, and ketchup because it makes them taste like they should. It's an ingredient used when those foods are homemade too.
post #14 of 78
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post #15 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Sugar is used in pasta sauces, breads, and ketchup because it makes them taste like they should. It's an ingredient used when those foods are homemade too.

I have never made pasta sauce or bread that involved sugar.
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