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Voxsartoria's Weekly WAYWRN Subjective and Totally Unfair Digest - Page 8

post #106 of 2153
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemas22 View Post
Oh, these were my pre SF days Plus I was like 18 at that time

I'll try to wear them this summer, though. I'll post pics

Be sure not to let SF furl your freak flag...fly it high.


- B
post #107 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Be sure not to let SF furl your freak flag...fly it high. - B
Thanks! Naaa, not after my orange loafers http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...ostcount=23380 Flag flies high! Can't wait till summer
post #108 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Oh, come now, G: Agnelli's reputation for elegance predates the Internet. If we exclude him as an inspiration for dressing well, we are left with standards that might be impossible to apply in the real world. Is part of your point that Agnelli was helped along considerably by being so handsome and living as a conspicuous man of wealth, lending a bit of aura to his clothes rather than drawing from them? I think that there is a bit of truth to that. But, that is as it should be, don't you think? The man wearing the clothes and not the other way around. - B
Oh, I didn't mean to imply that Agnelli's reputation as a fine dresser is a recent phenomenon, the internet has broadened his appeal, by making him more 'visable' but his reputation existed before the advent of the internet. How he obtained his clothes doesn't concern me, I'm talking about his style in isolation from that, just the clothes, the style. I don't see anything deserving of his great reputation as a dresser. The 'fascination' with C. Grant I can understand, also the DoW, who was very innovative, if not entirely sane, but not Agnelli. What is it that you like about him?
post #109 of 2153
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
What is it that you like about him?

That's a good question, and I will have to think about that before I answer.

In the meantime, Will makes one of the points that I might.


- B
post #110 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
That's a good question, and I will have to think about that before I answer.

In the meantime, Will makes one of the points that I might.


- B

Will does make some valid points. The suppression/simplification of colour and pattern can be just as 'shocking' as it's presence can be. It just depends on the prevailing mode at the time. Also, the passing of time has a habit of making what was once innovate, now seem tame, we all sometimes forget that, familiarity breeds contempt as they say...

I look forward to your musings on Agnelli, maybe others can offer theirs as well...
post #111 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemas22 View Post
Hmmm, I have these: bought in 2002 or 2003. But I don't see their staying power. Haven't worn them for ages.
These have a late sixties early seventies vibe about them. Probably look good with a velvet suit or even a medium blue-grey chalk stripe with an aggressive cut and detailing.
post #112 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
These have a late sixties early seventies vibe about them. Probably look good with a velvet suit or even a medium blue-grey chalk stripe with an aggressive cut and detailing.

+1

I used to wear them with a Dior Homme black suit, for evening wear.
post #113 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
How he obtained his clothes doesn't concern me, I'm talking about his style in isolation from that, just the clothes, the style. I don't see anything deserving of his great reputation as a dresser. The 'fascination' with C. Grant I can understand, also the DoW, who was very innovative, if not entirely sane, but not Agnelli.

More importantly, I don't understand the fora's infatuation with a bunch of drawings from the 1930's.
post #114 of 2153
Even if you take into account the sideways lean, Manton has some crazy monkey arms.
post #115 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by triniboy27 View Post
More importantly, I don't understand the fora's infatuation with a bunch of drawings from the 1930's.
Part of it is a general lament for the simpler days of yore which almost anyone can appreciate but I think part of it is also the belief that by impersonating a former time, the wearer (or viewer) has a better standing or place in the world.
post #116 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
Part of it is a general lament for the simpler days of yore which almost anyone can appreciate but I think part of it is also the belief that by impersonating a former time, the wearer (or viewer) has a better standing or place in the world.

There is undoubtedly some truth to this, but I wouldn't immediately assume there aren't other good reasons for dressing like people did in another time. Maybe there is something objectively better about it.

Otherwise, you could make similar assumptions about the motivations of people who dress to contemporary norms. At the end, you can tell very little about anything or anybody by merely identifying the standards they seem to follow.
post #117 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
Part of it is a general lament for the simpler days of yore which almost anyone can appreciate but I think part of it is also the belief that by impersonating a former time, the wearer (or viewer) has a better standing or place in the world.

There also seems to be a greater expression of colour, patterns and textures in those old plates, more than you see in today's fashion media which is strange when you consider that we've never had more choices available to us and at lower cost. Fashion/style seems to have become somewhat homogenised with few men showing much creative individualism, which is a topic in itself.

With the AA/Esquire plates the key I feel is to be inspired and learn from them, then build from there. I wouldn't think it's a good idea to just run out and have a facsimile made.
post #118 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
There is undoubtedly some truth to this, but I wouldn't immediately assume there aren't other good reasons for dressing like people did in another time. Maybe there is something objectively better about it.

Otherwise, you could make similar assumptions about the motivations of people who dress to contemporary norms. At the end, you can tell very little about anything or anybody by merely identifying the standards they seem to follow.

You are so dense.
post #119 of 2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
You are so dense.

post #120 of 2153
To me the message in those old pics are dressing for the occasion. Every pic is in a different local, portraying multiple situations from business to casual to formal events to the horse track to the beach and the clothing reflects the feeling/formality/casualness of the occasion. The accessories, the colors, patterns all reflect a mood congruent to the setting. It is conveying a mode/attitude of dressing that is pretty much lost today. Most men have generic year round wardrobes that denote "one suit for all reasons and all seasons". SF posters excluded. Go to a meeting or a party and see how similar everyone looks. You'll know what I'm saying.
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