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clothes in the movie 'great gatsby' - Page 4

post #46 of 84
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Hope that definition is not for me, Jon... I happen to have a team of flatlander slaves who 'serve' me very well... Okay, I'll stop now...
Serve means anyone in any position: From person who serves as CEO to a person who serves as a janitor. And no, it was meant for Dakota rube. Jon.
post #47 of 84
Pardon me for flaming (if the term is even applicable), but I have on more than one occasion read posts here denigrating sales clerks or others in the service sector for nothing other than their profession. This disturbs me. (Cue nostalgic music) I worked my way through college as a sales clerk (EarthShoes), a window dresser, a waiter and a sorority house busboy. All positions of servitude by some measure. Was it personally or emotionally rewarding work? No; it was a way to pay the bills. I was tossed out of my house when I was eighteen and did what I had to do to keep the wolves away from the door. The work itself was never demeaning, but there were many times when I'd like to have strangled a customer who came in with a haughty, holier than thou attitude. There is a difference between service and servant, but a lot of folks don't get it. I'm a more empathic person today because of these experiences. I have walked a mile in their shoes, and appreciate them for who they are: people just doing their jobs, trying to make ends meet. Truth be told, I'd rather spend time with workin' folk who know adversity and how to deal with it, than with the privileged who have neither earned their material wealth nor appreciate their blessings. Finis
post #48 of 84
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Pardon me for flaming (if the term is even applicable), but I have on more than one occasion read posts here denigrating sales clerks or others in the service sector for nothing other than their profession. This disturbs me. (Cue nostalgic music) I worked my way through college as a sales clerk (EarthShoes), a window dresser, a waiter and a sorority house busboy. All positions of servitude by some measure. Was it personally or emotionally rewarding work? No; it was a way to pay the bills. I was tossed out of my house when I was eighteen and did what I had to do to keep the wolves away from the door. The work itself was never demeaning, but there were many times when I'd like to have strangled a customer who came in with a haughty, holier than thou attitude. There is a difference between service and servant, but a lot of folks don't get it. I'm a more empathic person today because of these experiences. I have walked a mile in their shoes, and appreciate them for who they are: people just doing their jobs, trying to make ends meet. Truth be told, I'd rather spend time with workin' folk who know adversity and how to deal with it, than with the privileged who have neither earned their material wealth nor appreciate their blessings. Finis
Fair enough...
post #49 of 84
Jon, you're missing the point. What many (including me) have reacted to badly in your post was not that you want the employees to do their job, but rather that you have a very snotty attitude about those who make money in the range you previously quoted. Being unhappy with someone playing the a**hole is certainly understandable; acting in kind is not. I thought this was a gentlemen's forum.
post #50 of 84
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Jon, you're missing the point. What many (including me) have reacted to badly in your post was not that you want the employees to do their job, but rather that you have a very snotty attitude about those who make money in the range you previously quoted. Being unhappy with someone playing the asshole is certainly understandable; acting in kind is not. I thought this was a gentlemen's forum.
Yeah, what he said.
post #51 of 84
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Jon, you're missing the point. What many (including me) have reacted to badly in your post was not that you want the employees to do their job, but rather that you have a very snotty attitude about those who make money in the range you previously quoted. Being unhappy with someone playing the asshole is certainly understandable; acting in kind is not. I thought this was a gentlemen's forum.
Ah, no you misunderstand: I was using the money as example of a salesperson who acts snotty towards a customer regarding the price of the merchandise in the store, but that he/she his/herself cannot afford. As well, when did I say I acted in kind towards them? I simply stated my observations and without asking me for further details I was berated based on imaginary plot holes filled into my story which are completely fictional. Assumptions are just that. Dakota rube said Finis, and I was going to leave it at that...but alas... Jon.
post #52 of 84
I did not say you acted in kind towards them. And once again, it is how you have come across in this thread that has people up in arms. I teach a course in business communication strategies, which combines linguistic-based discourse analysis with sociology and business savvy. One of the basic tennets in this field is that it is not what you say, it is how you say it. Sounds almost too simple and yet it is the rock of interpersonal communication. Making denigrating remarks about people who do not make much money because they do not make much money is insulting and boorish, to say the least. Now, if something else was meant, it would be advisable to rethink communication tactics (and examples) in the future in order to come across more sympathetically. The very fact that several of us have come forward on this issue suggests that this tactic was, perhaps, misunderstood (or, if not, that it was unacceptable by general social standards).
post #53 of 84
Thread Starter 
Dakota Rube, You should read the thread about tipping in the social and food section. That was a lot worse.
post #54 of 84
Let me interpret a bit what Jon undoubtedly meant to say (since I saw how he acted in stores first-hand, and he was always exceedingly polite).  In most high-end stores, the salespeople there EXPECT you to buy something; if you go in with the attitude of "just looking" MOST OF THE TIME, (as has been my experience), you get treated like crap.  What Jon was objecting to is someone, just by virtue of their selling at a high-end store, (as opposed to say, McDonalds) would give such an attitude to a customer (see the irony)?  I think his statement is clearly being misinterpreted, as stated above, I saw how he conducted himself at said stores with salespeople.  And to be fair to the salespeople, we were treated very well at all the places we visited (Vacca, Borrelli, Trillian, RL) even though it was clearly obvious we weren't going to buy anything.  Hope this clears things up a bit. koji
post #55 of 84
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(Dakota rube @ April 20 2005,22:09)
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Originally Posted by imageWIS,April 20 2005,09:56
People who come in and spend in one hour on clothes what you spend on 2 months rent should not be looked down upon for any reason...least of all because you are working at the "˜flagship'. It's your job to serve them you should be thankful they come into the store and not the other way around, I mean why else would they pay you commission?
Yahzir yahzir. It shore be nice to be seein' youze in heyah today boss. Get off your high horse Jon.
Since you don't offer a counter argument and just merely say a statement indicative of your opinion towards me and not towards what I said, it would be futile to continue to write my thoughts regarding this discussion. Jon.
I thought DR retorted not based upon his opinion of you (though that might be part of it) but of what you said.
post #56 of 84
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(Dakota rube @ April 20 2005,22:37)
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Originally Posted by imageWIS,April 20 2005,21:23
Since you don't offer a counter argument and just merely say a statement indicative of your opinion towards me and not towards what I said, it would be futile to continue to write my thoughts regarding this discussion. Jon.
My words were indicative of my opinion of what you said. Since you and I have never met, nor carried on a conversation, they should not be construed as my opinion toward you. What is futile is anyone - especially a low-life flatlander like myself - attempting to make sense of the depth of your apparent arrogance toward people who are put on Earth to "serve" you.
To serve: "serve a purpose, role, or function" What is so complex, that the word serve needs further definition? Jon.
That's one definition. If you pick up the OED (which has _pages_ of sublte & not so subtle differences) or range around freely in the tradition of Western literature you'll find that the notion of serving or service had many connotations. "Service" in America -- in our peculiar democratic system -- has many connotations -- some more acceptable to some than to others. All of you in the service industry should be grateful when someone deigns to throw a few miserable sous at you. Yr humble servant, Horace
post #57 of 84
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a sorority house busboy.
Please tell me you have good stories from this. I was watching this movie once, and- well never mind.
post #58 of 84
So, Ralph Lauren, huh? Thanks for the posts on that topic, guys. Very interesting. Speaking of Gatsby, did you know that The Da Vinci Code has sold more copies in the few years it has been published than Gatsby has sold in all its years? Crazy. And of sightings, Calvin Klein used to have breakfast in my (previous) neighborhood greasy spoon (Landmark Diner, across from the old NYPD headquarters).
post #59 of 84
On his excursions to his manse in the Hamptons, CK would often have his limo stop off at the famous Pastrami King in the less-than-posh borough of Queens, NY for a "nosh". His now ex-wife, Kelly, the ultimate "shiksa", was interviewed not too long ago about her former husband's Jewish gustatory tendencies, and actually said CK especially loved eating "those potato nishes". She was clueless that the "k" in "knish" is not silent. Talk about a cultural divide. Grayson
post #60 of 84
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 His now ex-wife, Kelly, the ultimate "shiksa", was interviewed not too long ago about her former husband's Jewish gustatory tendencies, and actually said CK especially loved eating "those potato nishes".  She was clueless that the "k" in "knish" is not silent.  Talk about a cultural divide. Grayson
Oh if the knish were their only difference inpreferences. (Or maybe you could say they shared the same preferences.)
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