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which is a better city: Chicago or New York? - Page 11

post #151 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
Wouldn't Northwestern and UChicago be superior to NYU and Columbia?

In my opinion, no.
post #152 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
seriously, does anybody who has spent serious time in both believe that nyc is better for culinary diversity? I mean, that his the myth, but I don't believe it is true. nyc has better chinese, chicago better vietnamese, mexican, indian and italian. nyc better bagels, chicago better german. nyc better ny style pizza, chicago better chicago style pizza.

While I can speak to some things, I will keep it to Viet food. My wife who is from Vietnam claims that the Viet food in Nyc > Viet food in Chicago (nothing beats SoCal). This is in terms of quality and quantity.

In terms of diversity being a product of quantity-- Chicago does not have any Khmer (Cambodian), Laos or Burmese restaurants that I know of--could be wrong. Over the past 100 years, more immigrants have settled in NYC--thus giving them more culinary diversity.
post #153 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaogou View Post
In my opinion, no.

In my opinion, yes.
post #154 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
In my opinion, yes.
Well, I think that Columbia and Chicago are about equal in prestige. I can say with a good deal of confidence that in the humanities they are indeed on common ground. For example, both institutions have perennially top 10 history programs. Another aspect: I think most agree that Columbia's public policy/int'l studies school is better than Chicago's. But again, that is up for grabs. As for NYU and Northwestern...well, I think Northwestern is better as a comprehensive university. And FWIW, which is admittedly not much, NYU surely has better name recognition on the East Coast. NYU does have some esteemed programs like law and medicine, though those are also exceedingly good at Northwestern.
post #155 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaogou View Post
While I can speak to some things, I will keep it to Viet food. My wife who is from Vietnam claims that the Viet food in Nyc > Viet food in Chicago (nothing beats SoCal). This is in terms of quality and quantity.

In terms of diversity being a product of quantity-- Chicago does not have any Khmer (Cambodian), Laos or Burmese restaurants that I know of--could be wrong. Over the past 100 years, more immigrants have settled in NYC--thus giving them more culinary diversity.

point taken. I am not a real conisuer of vn food. what I like about chicago is that you have, what I find to be good vn food easily accesible

and, yes, haven't noticed any khmer loation or burmese food in chicago.
post #156 of 198
I grew up in Chicago and have never visited NY. But I have several friends and family members who have visited NYC. From what they say Chicago they like Chicago better. I'm going to say I'm biased and just stick with Chicago.

What's with all the hype on Indian food? Sorry I've tried it a few times and it's OK but not something I'd go out of my way to get.

Also everyone gets that Mexican food changes by region? So food here in South Texas is different then the food you find in El Paso, AZ, or CA.
post #157 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarmac View Post
Hmm, it's called Second City for a reason.

A great city, but clearly second.

Study up - it's called the "Second City" because it was rebuilt after the Chicago Fire, thus the rebuilt Chicago was "second."
post #158 of 198
I'm sure the experience of living there would alter my perception, but it seemed pretty awesome to have affordable, nice townhomes right down the road from the Wrigley area. Friends who actually live in Chicago are not so big on Wrigleyville, though.

As a strike against it, I'm not sure I could live in Chicago without a car (enormous bonus to NY/SF, IMO) and the guns laws are bullshit (as they are in NY/SF as well, of course).

Not sure about current Chicago music, but a lot of music I love (Jon Langford/Old 97's/Bloodshot Records) has strong ties there.
post #159 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post

You could live pretty decently in both cities with about $1M going out the door annually in taxes, food, clothes, and paper products (cups, plates, napkins). Other stuff, too, like nice ink for your fountain pens and contributions to the political party of your choice. Cable.

Once you drop down to around $250K, though, you would have to move to somewhere like Indiana or maybe San Francisco to get by.


- B
post #160 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by milosz View Post
I'm sure the experience of living there would alter my perception, but it seemed pretty awesome to have affordable, nice townhomes right down the road from the Wrigley area. Friends who actually live in Chicago are not so big on Wrigleyville, though.

As a strike against it, I'm not sure I could live in Chicago without a car (enormous bonus to NY/SF, IMO) and the guns laws are bullshit (as they are in NY/SF as well, of course).

Not sure about current Chicago music, but a lot of music I love (Jon Langford/Old 97's/Bloodshot Records) has strong ties there.

I lived in Wrigleyville for a year. It's fine, if a little boring. Annoying as hell on game days. But otherwise very nice.
And trust me, you can definitely live in Chicago without a car. Easily.
post #161 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I lived in Wrigleyville for a year. It's fine, if a little boring. Annoying as hell on game days. But otherwise very nice.
And trust me, you can definitely live in Chicago without a car. Easily.

This was my impression. Between the L and cabs, I don't see how it wouldn't be very doable to live there without a car.

Having only visited (i.e. never lived in) both my vote goes to Chicago, hands down. To this Southern suburbanite they're both huge cities, so almost any advantage NYC has here is moot. I'm sure there are some things NYC offers that Chicago doesn't, but at some point cities become big enough that such differences become too minuscule to be of concern. Also, the people in Chicago were much more laid back and polite.
post #162 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrG View Post
This was my impression. Between the L and cabs, I don't see how it wouldn't be very doable to live there without a car.

Having only visited (i.e. never lived in) both my vote goes to Chicago, hands down. To this Southern suburbanite they're both huge cities, so almost any advantage NYC has here is moot. I'm sure there are some things NYC offers that Chicago doesn't, but at some point cities become big enough that such differences become too minuscule to be of concern. Also, the people in Chicago were much more laid back and polite.
I agree, completely. I visit Chicago very often and never, never get tired of going. Once I arrive I leave the car parked until it's time to leave regardless of how many days I'm there.
post #163 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
You could live pretty decently in both cities with about $1M going out the door annually in taxes, food, clothes, and paper products (cups, plates, napkins). Other stuff, too, like nice ink for your fountain pens and contributions to the political party of your choice. Cable.

Once you drop down to around $250K, though, you would have to move to somewhere like Indiana or maybe San Francisco to get by.


- B
QFT.
post #164 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel12345 View Post
Study up - it's called the "Second City" because it was rebuilt after the Chicago Fire, thus the rebuilt Chicago was "second."
I hadn't know that, which led me to wikipedia, which reaffirmed why I love wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...es_for_Chicago

My new personal favorite nickname for Chicago is now "The Miami of Canada"
post #165 of 198
Thread Starter 
You can also still get an iPhone in Chicago.

Quote:
http://business.theatlantic.com/2009..._york_city.php

Apparently AT&T has decided to stop selling iPhones in the New York City area because its network can't handle any more iPhone usage. While I applaud the company's honesty in addressing a problem, I'm utterly shocked it would get to this point. I found this report doubtful, but I verified it myself on the AT&T website -- NYC zip codes can't buy iPhones anymore.
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