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Suit Fit Question - Page 2

post #16 of 24
As well, to add; many details were originally based on functional particulars, they have simply become outmoded but have remained de rigeur. Jon.
post #17 of 24
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As well, to add; many details were originally based on functional particulars, they have simply become outmoded but have remained de rigeur.
But you would think that some of the completely useless ones would disappear. If the 2b suits fall out of fashion and are replaced with 1b (same w/o the useless button) do you think 2b would ever come back? Mathieu
post #18 of 24
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Boutonniere for a flower or things like the legion d'honneur. May be marginally useful but it is not completely useless.
Hardly anyone wears them.  And in any case this is a repurposing.  Some designers have tried to do away with them, yet they hang on, even among the 99.9% of men who never, ever wear a medal or boutonniere.
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Remove them and the jacket looks completely different (not the case of the bottom button).
True enough, but so what?  A lot of things look completely different than they used to.
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They add weight.
And yet that weight is not so important that cuffs are required on city suits; and of course cuffs are forbidden on formal trousers. One can say the same thing about the suit itelf.  What practical, functional (not social) purpose does it really serve?  In a lot of ways, it's a pain.  Less comfortable and more bother than a whole host of alternatives.  And yet it survives. As does the almost completely useless necktie. Look, the point is, no one really can give a fully rational account of any clothing style.  The best one can do is trace the history.  Some tailors and desingers have tried to kill the bottom buttonhole on the 2-button suit.  So far, they have failed.  The one-button coat is a niche.  Maybe it will sweep the world, maybe it won't.  Who can say? You asked me why that buttonhole is still there; "tradition" is the best I can do.  I venture to say it is the best that anyone can do.
post #19 of 24
I'll reinforce the original question: if the last button is undone (as it should be), should the bottom-tip of the tie been seen (like half an inch)? B
post #20 of 24
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One can say the same thing about the suit itelf.  What practical, functional (not social) purpose does it really serve?  In a lot of ways, it's a pain.  Less comfortable and more bother than a whole host of alternatives.  And yet it survives. As does the almost completely useless necktie.
"Less comfortable and more bother than a whole host of alternatives. " For example this fine RLPL offering.
post #21 of 24
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I'll reinforce the original question: if the last button is undone (as it should be), should the bottom-tip of the tie been seen (like half an inch)?
Debatable. If I were to state the "rule" (and I guess I might as well) I would say "No." But I have seen men in coats with high buttoning points and open quarters, with their ties peeking through below the waist button, and they didn't look too shabby.
post #22 of 24
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"Less comfortable and more bother than a whole host of alternatives. " For example this fine RLPL offering.
This item has certainly been the butt of many jokes Grayson
post #23 of 24
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(Buster @ April 13 2005,11:33) I'll reinforce the original question: if the last button is undone (as it should be), should the bottom-tip of the tie been seen (like half an inch)?
Debatable.  If I were to state the "rule" (and I guess I might as well) I would say "No."  But I have seen men in coats with high buttoning points and open quarters, with their ties peeking through below the waist button, and they didn't look too shabby.
I would say no, but it has happened to me on occasion.
post #24 of 24
Perhaps if one does not like seeing the tie peeping out and there are no suitable fixes for this, then perhaps getting a three-piece suit would be a good choice? About not buttoning the last button, perhaps it could be about movement. It would look better to have more of the skirt moving when our legs move. If the last button were buttoned, there will be lesser 'moveable parts', especially if the suit has is a two-buttoned suit and has a low button stance and the last button is very near the bottom of the jacket. It will look blocky. As for three buttons, movement could be the thing as well, although it could also probably be because not buttoning the last button will make the protrusion made by the belt less obvious, especially when the belt is very close to the second button in height... But how about for vests? The bottom buttons are not buttoned. I don't think it is to aid fluidity in movement. Belt again? Possibly. Usually the vests ends just right after the belt (since the belt should be covered completely but no more, right?) and buttoning the last button will cause the bottom of the vest to turn inward, causing an unsightly protrusion. So... suspenders? Oh... for flat bottom vests, are the last buttons unbuttoned as well? The buttons seem further away from the buttom because the base is flat so it wouldn't look good to leave it unbuttoned, would it? WJTW
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