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Wine help

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
So i've recently started to get into wine with my 21st birthday approaching. Only thing is i don't know to much right now and was hoping someone could recommend either websites (looking for investment pieces as well), books, or any other information so i can learn more about wine and about using wine as an investment.
post #2 of 23
I would recommend a subscription to Wine Spectator. It's very well-written, and has both wine and food features. It tests thousands of wines a year, and is very in tune with budget wines (current issue lists 100 wines to get under $15) and new drinkers. Good website too.
post #3 of 23
I'd look at Wine Advocate over Wine Spectator, I think WS is kind of a joke, but that's just my opinion about their ratings of various wines/vintages. I would be extremely careful trying to buy wine as an investment as you need to know quite a bit about each vintage and its aging potential to make money in this way.
post #4 of 23
Quote:
think WS is kind of a joke, but that's just my opinion about their ratings of various wines/vintages.
I've not done an exhaustive survey, but I find that WA and WS generally rank the same wines in a similar way. Although Robert Parker (the WA) is perhaps a tougher grader, they are similar.
post #5 of 23
69 for 2001 Montelena Estate? 69 for 2001 Beaulieu Georges Latour Private Reserve? The 2001 GDL is quite a good wine (RP 90) but the 2001 Montelena borders on a transcendent one (RP 95) and Laube gave it a 69? 69 for most wine reviewers is like the wine that Miles consumed from the spit bucket at "Frass Canyon" and giving it to a great wine because of TCA (which I haven't yet experienced in my first six bottles of 2001 Montelena estate) is just ridiculous and has made me lose all respect for WS. Also, look at their comparisons of barrel samples to actually in bottle scores, RP is pretty close, WS is all over the place, they gave some wines 95-100 in barrel to give them 91 in the bottle. 95-100 means the wine is a once in a decade vintage, 91 is pedestrian...
post #6 of 23
Hi, I'm new to the forum. I live in Sacramento near Livermore, Amador County, and Napa (Napa is about an hour away. I was wine tasting in Napa last Friday). On a trip to France and Germany last year I found that the best wines were right here in the states. We have Beverages and More, Cost Plus, Costco, and specialty wine stores right here in our backyard. I would suggest buying different varieties of wine and learn to distinguish between them. The best bottle isn't the most expensive. It really depends on your personal taste. Depending on where you live, a great way to enjoy wine is to sign up with one of the vinyards for a club membership and have the wines shipped right to your door. If you go to the vintners Web sites or the individual wine maker's Web sites they usually provide a ton of information to learn about the process of winemaking and investing in wine. Have fun.
post #7 of 23
I generally favor more information over less, so I'll continue to read Wine Spectator, and continue to recommend that others do as well.
post #8 of 23
One book that will help with some basic knowledge is Kevin Zraly's "Windows on the World Complete Wine Course." Good overview and helps make the transition from our US-based view of wine (based on grape variety) to old-world view, based on place. There are many, many books but I think this one stands the test of time, and is written in a very approachable style. I've heard decent things about Andrea Immer's book but haven't actually seen it. The periodicals will give articles, their reviews (their opinions) of wines, and food-wine pairings. But I think one needs the background info provided by a book on the basics coupled with tasting a bunch of wines before reviews from other people can be valuable. Let one of the books guide you through some tastings and go from there. Enjoy and most of all - have fun.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
69 for 2001 Montelena Estate?  
I missed that in WS. Yikes. No wonder a wine store near me was recently selling it for $60 per bottle. Who knows what Laube's been smoking -- he's become so divisive over the last 3 or so years, what with his TCA rampages and inflamatory articles about Mondavi, etc.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Hi, I'm new to the forum. I live in Sacramento near Livermore, Amador County, and Napa (Napa is about an hour away. I was wine tasting in Napa last Friday). On a trip to France and Germany last year I found that the best wines were right here in the states. We have Beverages and More, Cost Plus, Costco, and specialty wine stores right here in our backyard. I would suggest buying different varieties of wine and learn to distinguish between them. The best bottle isn't the most expensive. It really depends on your personal taste. Depending on where you live, a great way to enjoy wine is to sign up with one of the vinyards for a club membership and have the wines shipped right to your door. If you go to the vintners Web sites or the individual wine maker's Web sites they usually provide a ton of information to learn about the process of winemaking and investing in wine. Have fun.
There are certainly some great wines made in the US, I would hesitate to say that "the best wines are made here in the states" but in 20-30 years, that may well be true. For now, France does still make the world's best wines IMO.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Quote (unstacy @ April 12 2005,09:19) Hi, I'm new to the forum. I live in Sacramento near Livermore, Amador County, and Napa (Napa is about an hour away. I was wine tasting in Napa last Friday). On a trip to France and Germany last year I found that the best wines were right here in the states. We have Beverages and More, Cost Plus, Costco, and specialty wine stores right here in our backyard. I would suggest buying different varieties of wine and learn to distinguish between them. The best bottle isn't the most expensive. It really depends on your personal taste. Depending on where you live, a great way to enjoy wine is to sign up with one of the vinyards for a club membership and have the wines shipped right to your door. If you go to the vintners Web sites or the individual wine maker's Web sites they usually provide a ton of information to learn about the process of winemaking and investing in wine. Have fun. There are certainly some great wines made in the US, I would hesitate to say that "the best wines are made here in the states" but in 20-30 years, that may well be true. For now, France does still make the world's best wines IMO.
Drizzt, I read unstacy's post literally "...best wine are right here" rather than "made here." I have seen foreign wines at the places mentioned. I do think the US makes one wine that really can't be compared to anything else - Zinfandel - especially those from Paso Robles and Amador. The Primotivi I've had from Italy don't come close, but I have to admit to never having wines from the Croatian source. I agree, I think the US is still trying to find its long term style - but you have to wonder if there's a universally-accepted definition of "best" when it comes to something as subjective as wine?
post #12 of 23
Quote:
I agree, I think the US is still trying to find its long term style - but you have to wonder if there's a universally-accepted definition of "best" when it comes to something as subjective as wine?
Bingo. There are trends in winemaking. Has anyone seen Mondovino? I haven't yet, but I heard the tail-end of an interview of the film's director on NPR, and it sounds like maybe we are going towards uniformization, if we are to believe him.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Bingo. There are trends in winemaking. Has anyone seen Mondovino? I haven't yet, but I heard the tail-end of an interview of the film's director on NPR, and it sounds like maybe we are going towards uniformization, if we are to believe him.
And not just in wine, either. This is one of the reasons for the rise in popularity of groups like Slow Food and programs like their Ark/Presedia foods - to help counter these trends and preserve what's unique to a food, place, region. Of course, one reason put forth for this trend towards uniformization is the power of a few important critics/publications: high ratings mean higher profits, so make the wines the way the critics want...and they all wind up tasting the same, more or less, and the world is poorer for it.
post #14 of 23
I don't think the US (well at least Napa Valley) does make wines in a similar style to Europe, they are catering to the US market and generally making wines that are ready to drink sooner (especially Pinot/Cabs) and in my opinion, wines are getting more diverse in style, not less. There has been a lot of debate about Mondovino, and many people have pointed out that the director has a definite agenda. These threads are interesting reads, re: Mondovino http://fora.erobertparker.com/ubb....#000000 http://fora.erobertparker.com/ubb/ul...c/1/54628.html
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the responses i was gonna check out those magazines i guess i can just read both seeing as certan people like one or the other. But thanks again.
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