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Leather or rubber soles? - Page 2

post #16 of 171
I must be buying the wrong shoes but rubber soles are more comfortable to me. I have a couple AEs, two Santonis and a pair of Taryn Rose (the most comfortable of the bunch). Are you guys on your feet a lot? I know that any day I'm going to be in the hospital for more than 8 hours, I'm either in sneakers and scrubs or wearing my Eccos, Bostonians or Dressports.
post #17 of 171
We also have to ask ourselves: for those who say rubber is more comfortable (myself included), are rubber-soled shoes more comfortable because they have rubber soles, or is it that shoes that have rubber soles (e.g., more casual and less formal) tend to be more comfortable simply because of the style of the shoe?
post #18 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by needshoehelp View Post
We also have to ask ourselves: for those who say rubber is more comfortable (myself included), are rubber-soled shoes more comfortable because they have rubber soles, or is it that shoes that have rubber soles (e.g., more casual and less formal) tend to be more comfortable simply because of the style of the shoe?

To be or not to be....
post #19 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by needshoehelp View Post
We also have to ask ourselves: for those who say rubber is more comfortable (myself included), are rubber-soled shoes more comfortable because they have rubber soles, or is it that shoes that have rubber soles (e.g., more casual and less formal) tend to be more comfortable simply because of the style of the shoe?

Why do you assume rubber soled shoes are styled differently? I own the same style shoe in both rubber and leather soles, and I've had soles replaced with their opposite more than once.
post #20 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by nordicstyle View Post
How can I see if a shoe is Goodyear welted?



Quote:
Originally Posted by nordicstyle View Post
Yeah, I have noticed. Ferner Jacobsen has a couple of Church's and L'Escalier had a pair of Crockett & Jones (on sale, 50% off ), but that's pretty much it as far as I have been able to dig up.

Agnar Hagen in Bogstadveien also carries Church's.

The selection in Oslo is really bad, and really overpriced since the demand is apparently very low, so I usually buy shoes when I'm traveling or online (if I know my size on the relevant last). Alden of Carmel is great for Aldens. I've also ordered a few pairs of Allen-Edmonds from Sky Valet Shoes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nordicstyle View Post
Funny you should mention that. I was just at his store today, but it wasn't open. Going back there tomorrow if I have the time. I was told he also carries Allen-Edmonds, but maybe they mixed the name up with Alden?

I saw no Allen-Edmonds when I was there in August.
post #21 of 171
The latter for safety on the slippery marble surfaces which seem to line every building, public or private, that I enter in this country.
post #22 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimile View Post
Hi,
Here are some answers to your questions:

1) leather
2) leather
3) rubber, preferably 'commando'
4) yes, can be used in the rain. Think of people in London !
5) Thicker soles, last longer, often chunkier, still formal.
6) yes, leather soles are slippery, even more slipepry on ice.
7) definitely yes for leather soles, no for rubber soles.

Hvor bor du i Norge ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbris1 View Post
So, here we go:

1) Which soles are considered the most formal? (I assume leather)

Leather

2) Which soles are best for walking/most comfortable? (I assume rubber)

See above


3) Can/should leather soles be used in the winter (i.e. subzero temperatures and snow)?

Leather, with overshoes

4) Can/should leather soles be used in the rain or when at risk of walking through water (i.e. after rain)?

See above

5) What are "double leather soles", what is their purpose and how noticeable are they compared to regular leather soles? (I assume last longer but looks more "clunky"/less formal)

Exactly as the name implies

By the looks of them (i.e. very flat/slippery) leather soles don't seem suited for walking on ice/slipp

See answer to 3



Leather soles may be the single most overrated thing on SF. They're great, and I do prefer them for formal shoes, but there's little wrong with a well-executed Dainite rubber sole. It's not terribly obvious when someone's wearing them on a welted shoe, unless you're looking specifically for it. And to suggest they're definitely more comfortable is just silly, particularly when, as even these folks have noted, leather soles tend to slip on certain surfaces, making walking more difficult.

Some people have convinced themselves that leather soles are so critical that they must be superior in every way to rubber soles, as opposed to just in many ways. I liken it to people who have actually convinced themselves that chicken or turkey breast actually tastes better and has more flavor than the dark meat, which is just patently not possible given the relative fat contents.
post #23 of 171
The only advantage of rubber to leather for a sole is grip. Maybe they will withstand water absorption better & protect you in the event you get struck by lightning, but that's it.
post #24 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbris1 View Post
The only advantage of rubber to leather for a sole is grip. Maybe they will withstand water absorption better & protect you in the event you get struck by lightning, but that's it.

I once again pose my question - do you spend large amounts of time on your feet?
post #25 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post


Leather soles may be the single most overrated thing on SF. They're great, and I do prefer them for formal shoes, but there's little wrong with a well-executed Dainite rubber sole. It's not terribly obvious when someone's wearing them on a welted shoe, unless you're looking specifically for it. And to suggest they're definitely more comfortable is just silly, particularly when, as even these folks have noted, leather soles tend to slip on certain surfaces, making walking more difficult.

Some people have convinced themselves that leather soles are so critical that they must be superior in every way to rubber soles, as opposed to just in many ways. I liken it to people who have actually convinced themselves that chicken or turkey breast actually tastes better and has more flavor than the dark meat, which is just patently not possible given the relative fat contents.

Sir, I think you should read carefully my answers. I am not an unconditional of leather outsoles. I tried to give nordicstyle my preference for each situation.
I still think that leather soles are WAY more comfortable for walking no matter what kind of rubber is used.
post #26 of 171
I wear both so I've got a foot in both camps (shoes ).

When we talk of rubber soles what sort of rubber soles do we mean? There's a massive difference in feel between crepe and dainite for example.

Generally I find single soled leather shoes to be the most comfortable on relatively even surfaces because they conform to your feet. Between Dainite and double leather soles there's little difference in comfort (and generally appearance). Dainite has a slightly greater slip resistance (not great in snow or on ice) and doesn't absorb water in foul english weather. Commando soles offer more grip than Dainite (although note the rubber compounds used to make commando soles varies from the soft and grippy to the hard less grippy but longer lasting (they're also ugly on anything but very sturdy country shoes/boots). Crepe I find comfortable but wears too quickly for me and whilst offering good dry weather traction doesn't perform that well when wet or on ice.
Topying leather adds a modicum of grip and water resistance whilst allowing the leather to flex a little, but is a compromise. As to the various other rubber soles I've no personal experience.
post #27 of 171
I have very flat feet (no arch at all), and as a result over the last few years I have developed bunions on both feet. My big toes angle inward, producing an outward bulge and pain at the first joint behind the toe.

To reduce my pain, my podiatrist recommended that in addition to wearing orthotics I should wear the stiffest shoe possible. Most single leather and rubber soles are therefore ruled out. Double oak leather soles are just about stiff enough, but the only rubber soles that work for me are very stiff Vibram soles in a shoe with a shank. These are few and far between, so the only rubber soled shoes I own are my hiking boots, a pair of Filson Uplander Oxfords and a pair of Aldens with a commando sole. The latter is still too flexy, so when the sole wears out I will replace it with a double leather sole + the commando.
post #28 of 171
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilhelm View Post
Agnar Hagen in Bogstadveien also carries Church's.

Ah, that is good to know. I will stop by and check it out the next time I'm in the area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wilhelm View Post
The selection in Oslo is really bad, and really overpriced since the demand is apparently very low, [...]

Yeah, especially in brown. I think almost nobody in Oslo wears (quality) dress shoes in brown. All I see is black, black, black and black. Also, wingtips do not seem to be very popular, so brown wingtips are a nightmare to track down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wilhelm View Post
I saw no Allen-Edmonds when I was there in August.

No. I talked to him yesterday, and he said he stopped selling them. I also asked about the rubber/leather soles, and he said he could put a thin layer of rubber on top of the leather to make it better for slippery surfaces, but he generally did not recommend using leather soled shoes with our current weather (yesterday it was a really, really "slushy" outside).

I think also he does not sell so much Alden any more. He recommended Edward Green, which I tried on, and they felt great (although somewhat expensive), so now I am drooling over the EG Inverness...
post #29 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofKent View Post
... When we talk of rubber soles what sort of rubber soles do we mean? There's a massive difference in feel between crepe and dainite for example.

... Dainite has a slightly greater slip resistance (not great in snow or on ice) and doesn't absorb water in foul english weather. Commando soles offer more grip than Dainite (although note the rubber compounds used to make commando soles varies from the soft and grippy to the hard less grippy but longer lasting (they're also ugly on anything but very sturdy country shoes/boots). ...

A good point to remember.

Generally think of rubber soles like rubber tires: running a continuum from hard&durable (with little grip on ice &c) to soft&grippy (but not nearly as durable.) I have found the Vibram "gumlite" sole to be good in the latter camp, so useful on 'winter' shoes.
post #30 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jumbie View Post
I once again pose my question - do you spend large amounts of time on your feet?

No
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