or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › bonfire of the vanities
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

bonfire of the vanities - Page 4

post #46 of 84
Well, there's some consonance in there too. But the sound-sight onomataopoeic thing is more akin to synesthesia.
post #47 of 84
Quote:
It's called assonance. edit:  Although it seems to also include a little bit of consonance as well.
I thought this was the proper definition of assonance. And what a poetic definition it is.
post #48 of 84
Quote:
Perhaps Wolfe displays some regard for McCoy's father (the "Lion" as I recall) and his generation.  Nice contrast between the Old Boys and the McCoys, as it were.  The Old Boys club wasn't one of virtue, but it was one of restraint.
I would also point out that in the Lion's generation, Wall St. was an exclusive club that denied a seat to minorities and women. In fact, you could be a white male, but still be locked out simply because you didn't go to the right elementary school. None of that guaranteed a certain competence. At least today, everybody may be a greedy asshole but at least they're more qualified and better than that previous generation.
post #49 of 84
Quote:
Quote:
(Manton @ April 12 2005,09:18) Comparing me to Wolfe is just about the greatest compliment anyone could possibly pay me. I am not Wolfe. I can only dream of writing that well.
The Title for Wolfe's next book on the heels of I am Charlotte Simmons... "I Am Not Wolfe" But Manton...I think that the comparison of you to Wolfe is in your respective fields... Awww....
Dude, that's so wrong. Jon.
post #50 of 84
Quote:
I don't think people remember how much of a &#*.hole New York was considered just 20 short years ago.
This is entirely correct. The situation changed due to a very few people, one of whom was a fellow named Daniel Biederman; another Rudy Giuliani. Dan took a very underused mechanism called the "Business Improvement District" - a private/public partnership designed to concentrate improvement efforts where they were most needed - and raised it to new heights with the Grand Central Partnership and the 34th Street Partnership. These two "BIDs", as they are known, spearheaded the formation of some 40 more such districts whose valiant efforts cleaned up not only the dirt, but, in partnership with the efforts of William Bratton, the crime as well. And so New York was transformed from the bankrupt "Fear City" of the '70's and early '80's back to the world's premier tourist destination with one of the highest "clean scores" and lowest crime rates of all of the major metropolitan areas. And, BTW, the premier shopping district for exciting luxury merchandise and clothing, the Madison Avenue we all love for our upscale clothing shops, was also saved from its 1980's decline in just this manner. That is why those who did not live through this period have trouble feeling the context of "Bonfires". Boring? Yes. True. Yes.
post #51 of 84
Since we're on the topic of Wall St. and books may I also suggest Monkey Business. It's a nice, quick read for those looking to see another side of things. Fellow analysts will surely laugh as hard as I did reading certain chapters.
post #52 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
The City Light is not necessarily the Post, which is after all right of center and has been since the 70s, whereas the City Light under Sir Gerald Steiner is clearly a liberal paper.
I really can't remember if City Light was supposed to be liberal or not. The NY Post is conservative, but Murdoch is also an oppurtunist. He would do just about anything if it helped his business despite his personal conservative bent. Examples include page 3 girls in his british tabloids and dropping programs that the Chinese government disliked . I think in the book, even a conservative NY Post-like tabloid would have covered the emerging scandal the way City Light did if it increased circulation. (As you can tell, I'm still bitter over FOX's ownership of the LA Dodgers). Now, that we are talking about literary devices, what is it called when you have two different actions taking place simulataneously, but while reading about one action it really describes the other action? Wolfe did this in Man in Full where the protaganist is reading a book, and the action in the book describes the action unfolding in the prision. Alan Moore also did this in Watchmen where the announcer on TV describing a gymnastics exhibition is really describing off panel copulation. Anybody read Bright Lights, Big City? I'm really looking for a different book that can lay claim to the title of zeigiest novel about the 80s. Any good? I'm big on Hornsby and Ishiguro.
post #53 of 84
Thread Starter 
How much does somebody need to earn today to be considered rich in NYC with average apartment costing over one million dollars? And, how much credit does Gullani deserve for the dropoff in crime in NYC? Didn't murder drop across the board in every other major metropolitian city during that time period? Before 9/11, it didn't seem Gullani was much beloved in the city especially from minorities.
post #54 of 84
Quote:
How much does somebody need to earn today to be considered rich in NYC with average apartment costing over one million dollars?
Rich? At least 5-10 million/ann.
Quote:
And, how much credit does Gullani deserve for the dropoff in crime in NYC? Didn't murder drop across the board in every other major metropolitian city during that time period?
Giuliani deserves most of it. He had the balls to lead the changes . The dropoff in crime was 1st in NYC; then other cities also began to follow the Bratton/Giuliani/Broken Windows model.
Quote:
Before 9/11, it didn't seem Gullani was much beloved in the city especially from minorities.
Absolutely right. Give the man a star. You don't make changes in a mob-corrupted, union-run, bureaucracy-entrenched city full of the arrogant & affluent - like New York - without being a total prick. Rudy is that. Thank God - he gave us back our City.
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Now, that we are talking about literary devices, what is it called when you have two different actions taking place simulataneously, but while reading about one action it really describes the other action? Wolfe did this in Man in Full where the protaganist is reading a book, and the action in the book describes the action unfolding in the prision. Alan Moore also did this in Watchmen where the announcer on TV describing a gymnastics exhibition is really describing off panel copulation.
something like mise en abyme?
post #56 of 84
Say what you will about the Post, it is absolutely inconceivable that it would push a story based on the say-so of a former 60s radical lawyer and to boost the standing of a Bacon/Sharpton figure.  I think Wolfe makes Fallow out to be an unprincipled scoundrel, but Sir Gerald Steiner (owner of the City Light) is presented as a fairly typical ex-pat "limousine liberal" who is going to show the callous Yanks the error of their ways.  Sir Gerald is not Murdoch.  There are too many differences.  And, in any case, Murdoch is not the only foreign tycoon to sweep into New York and buy a newspaper.
post #57 of 84
Crime in NYC fell sooner, faster, and more dramatically than it did in any other major American city during the 90s. In some neighborhoods, it fell much faster. But then of course it had a long way to fall.
post #58 of 84
Quote:
(As you can tell, I'm still bitter over FOX's ownership of the LA Dodgers).
Why?
post #59 of 84
Quote:
And, how much credit does Gullani deserve for the dropoff in crime in NYC? Didn't murder drop across the board in every other major metropolitian city during that time period?
Quote:
Giuliani deserves most of it. He had the balls to lead the changes . The dropoff in crime was 1st in NYC; then other cities also began to follow the Bratton/Giuliani/Broken Windows model.
That is debatable; in today's (Wednesday) WSJ, there is on page D14 a review of the book Freakonomics (Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner), which book includes a statistically demonstrable link between the legalization of abortion and the decline in crime; because NY state (along with a few other states) legalized abortion in 1970, 3 years before Roe v. Wade, it was among the first states to experience a decline in its crime rate.  (To quote from the review "Legalized abortion was the biggest factor in bringing the crime wave of the 1980's to a screeching halt.")
post #60 of 84
Quote:
That is debatable; in today's (Wednesday) WSJ, there is on page D14 a review of the book Freakonomics (Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner), which book includes a statistically demonstrable link between the legalization of abortion and the decline in crime; because NY state (along with a few other states) legalized abortion in 1970, 3 years before Roe v. Wade, it was among the first states to experience a decline in its crime rate.  (To quote from the review "Legalized abortion was the biggest factor in bringing the crime wave of the 1980's to a screeching halt.")
This thesis was completely demolished -- utterly, totally, and humiliatingly -- in a Slate debate that Levitt had with another writer several years ago. Levitt does not even attempt to refute -- does not even bring up -- in his book the arguments that sank his thesis in that debate. I call that intellectually dishonest, and almost cowardly.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › bonfire of the vanities