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Edward Green 802 Last (new?)

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Went shopping today.. shoe salesman had on a pair of EGs on the new 802 last (or so he said). I am no expert in EGs, but the 802 isn't listed in my EG catalog (which I received around Dec.), so they are probably new as he said. The shoes looked a lot like the 82 only slightly 'sharper' (more angled?) though the nose wasn't elongated. I am personally still a big fan of chisel toes (888s) but I have to admit the 802 is winning me over to the rounder side of things. I've noticed that Japan seems to get a lot of the new lasts rather early (like C&J 338s). On a slightly different topic, they're having a sale on EGs in Japan (EGs are almost NEVER on sale) at Seibu dept. stores . So at 30% off a pair of Dark Oak Berkeleys (202 last) are around $750 US. Which though is 'dirt cheap' in Japan, seems like slightly less than retail in other countries. I'm in the market for a pair of classic brown oxfords and Berkeleys fit the bill perfectly. They actually make my feet look 'wider' than I'd like and they're a little bit roomy (because it's a 202?).. but by God they're Greens. I know that EG is supposed to have their bi-annual sale in July which even including shipping, should be cheaper. Sale is over soon though so I gotta decide fast... Any advice?
post #2 of 21
EGs are around $850 in the U.S., if that helps. With the sale direct from Edward Green, you still have to pay shipping, shoe trees are quite a lot extra, and you end up paying in the $600s anyway. I'd say you're probably looking at a pretty good deal. Good luck.
post #3 of 21
Interesting. I thought the 82 was Tony's effort to "sharpen up" the 202. So is the 802 an even leaner 82? Perhaps it's just for the Japanese market; smaller, narrower feet and all that. Just a guess.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Perhaps it's just for the Japanese market; smaller, narrower feet and all that. Just a guess.
But Japanese feet aren't typically narrower. Supposedly, they're typically wider than American feet.
post #5 of 21
OK, so it was a bad, uninformed guess ...
post #6 of 21
Quote:
OK, so it was a bad, uninformed guess ...
Manton, you ignorant slut.
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Interesting. I thought the 82 was Tony's effort to "sharpen up" the 202. So is the 802 an even leaner 82? Perhaps it's just for the Japanese market; smaller, narrower feet and all that. Just a guess.
No idea. The 802 didn't seem as long as an 82 or 888. Japanese shoe fans seem to prefer narrower styles, hence the D width is hugely popular. I don't think Men's Isetan (the boutique of choice for clothes horses) even stock EGs (nor C&J) in E width.
post #8 of 21
Quote:
I've noticed that Japan seems to get a lot of the new lasts rather early (like C&J 338s).
And the new Vass Japanese last. If the pictures in Men's Ex The World of High-End Shoes, vols. 1 and 2 are any indication, the Japanese sees a lot of new and interesting things a lot earlier than we do in the US. Some of these are very, very good, and some are unspeakable; but they're always very interesting.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
But Japanese feet aren't typically narrower. Supposedly, they're typically wider than American feet.
Not sure about that; but I know that the C&J shoes sold at United Arrows (a major fashion retailer in Japan) are D width even though the same models sold via C&J in the UK are usually in E.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Not sure about that; but I know that the C&J shoes sold at United Arrows (a major fashion retailer in Japan) are D width even though the same models sold via C&J in the UK are usually in E.
It's entirely possible that I'm mistaken. I'm relying on Flusser here, not on any personal studies into the relative width of Japanese vs. American feet.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
But Japanese feet aren't typically narrower. Supposedly, they're typically wider than American feet.
I was speaking to Tony Gaziano a few weeks back and he mentioned that Japanese feet, although wide, were relative fatty (as opposed to bony). To make bespoke shoes for Japanese customers, he would always go a bit narrower than the actual measurements indicated. If Japanese stores stock primarily D fittings, that might also be a matter of vanity and the desirability of an elongated foot. If you go up ½ size in length, you can go down a width or two.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
If Japanese stores stock primarily D fittings, that might also be a matter of vanity and the desirability of an elongated foot. If you go up ½ size in length, you can go down a width or two.
That is plausable. Shoes made by Regal (one of the large Japanese manufacturers) are available in wider sizes. It just seems to be the imported shoes that are thinner. It may be that the market for EG and C&J prefer the more elongated look.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Quote:
But Japanese feet aren't typically narrower. Supposedly, they're typically wider than American feet.
Not sure about that; but I know that the C&J shoes sold at United Arrows (a major fashion retailer in Japan) are D width even though the same models sold via C&J in the UK are usually in E.
But a US "D" is more or less a UK "E". How do US and Japanese sizes translate?
post #14 of 21
Quote:
But a US "D" is more or less a UK "E". How do US and Japanese sizes translate?
The shoes I saw had the original UK sizes. The actual Japanese shoe sizing uses centimeters; so a US 10 is around a 27 in Japan. The width grading also uses an alphabetical system but I am not sure if it relates to the US or UK widths. Anyone?
post #15 of 21
Quote:
(JCusey) It's entirely possible that I'm mistaken. I'm relying on Flusser here, not on any personal studies into the relative width of Japanese vs. American feet.
Oh, no. Another candidate for short sleeved dress shirts. You must have nice elbows ...
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