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The Architecture Thread - Page 291

post #4351 of 4539
Here's a neatly arranged pile of bricks; 3.8 million of them to be exact.


post #4352 of 4539

320 k bricks in the Chau Chuk Wing 

post #4353 of 4539

I had a look at the "paper bag" building the last time I was in Sydney, mainly because I really like brick buildings! 

 

The design didn't really appeal to me, but I did really like the fact that it was made from bricks. 

post #4354 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

I like the inside much more than the outside, but I do love the brickwork. 

The unfortunate preference nowadays for using large, preformed concrete slabs to erect buildings means that very few large, modern buildings are made with brick - it's just too expensive compared to preformed concrete. 

You won't see many true brick load-bearing buildings anytime soon in developed countries. They're practically illegal in most modern building codes because they don't function in cold climates with the use of insulation, which has been prioritized. Every large "brick" building you see today is a concrete or steel-framed building with 3" of brick veneer wallpapered on. Outside of the efforts of a select few like Mario Botta, most are depressing piles of shit.
post #4355 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

You won't see many true brick load-bearing buildings anytime soon in developed countries. They're practically illegal in most modern building codes because they don't function in cold climates with the use of insulation, which has been prioritized.

I would say 90% of all danish buildings a brick buildings and the older ones are considered the most healthy ones to live in. Most older brick buildings have a double layer of brick with an air gap in-between, which can be filled up with insulation.

Contemporary cheaper type homes use concretes blocks with sheet of brick on the outside for aesthetic reasons.
post #4356 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


You won't see many true brick load-bearing buildings anytime soon in developed countries. They're practically illegal in most modern building codes because they don't function in cold climates with the use of insulation, which has been prioritized. Every large "brick" building you see today is a concrete or steel-framed building with 3" of brick veneer wallpapered on. Outside of the efforts of a select few like Mario Botta, most are depressing piles of shit.

 

That's both interesting and depressing - why is that (in reference to the bolded part above)? 

 

As FindFinn said, couldn't the buildings be made of so-called cavity brick - a double layer of brick with a space in between which can be either left as open, air-filled space or filled with insulation? 

 

My parents' house is cavity brick, with plaster-sheeting over the internal walls. It was built almost 50 years ago now, but although fairly expensive (due to greater use of bricks) it was pretty common in Australia back then. They had insulation installed between the two layers of brick back when it was built (which I understand was quite unusual at the time). 

post #4357 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
 

That's both interesting and depressing - why is that (in reference to the bolded part above)?

 

It would be depressing if it were true, but it's not.

 

It is not only possible to develop cavity-walled brick building to the highest standards of energy performance, it is being done even in the unimaginative UK. And it's certainly not 'illegal in modern building codes'. Check this example: http://www.pmcarchitects.com/blog/the-first-uk-cavity-wall-passivhaus/

 

I'm building a passive house right now BTW, and sitting here at a table with the Chair of the Canadian Passive House Institute, and do know just a little bit about the subject of insulation and energy efficiency in building...

post #4358 of 4539
That's not a brick loadbearing building, moron.
post #4359 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

That's both interesting and depressing - why is that (in reference to the bolded part above)? 

As FindFinn said, couldn't the buildings be made of so-called cavity brick - a double layer of brick with a space in between which can be either left as open, air-filled space or filled with insulation? 

Yes, you can build a cavity wall, but a cavity wall functions entirely differently from a load-bearing masonry wall. They have nothing in common with a 19th century brick building or most pre-war ones, which cannot use insulation, since internal heat is necessary to drive water out of the brick to prevent a freeze-thaw cycle. The vast majority of efforts to introduce insulation into traditional brick buildings have undermined their function and caused structural damage and air quality issues. It's fairly complicated and I could explain further, but I'm not interested right now. It's a long conversation.
post #4360 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

I would say 90% of all danish buildings a brick buildings and the older ones are considered the most healthy ones to live in. Most older brick buildings have a double layer of brick with an air gap in-between, which can be filled up with insulation.

Contemporary cheaper type homes use concretes blocks with sheet of brick on the outside for aesthetic reasons.


No. That's a recipe for disaster.
post #4361 of 4539
The grandpappy of brick skyscrapers.




post #4362 of 4539
Looks like telephone switching-station from 1950s with a horrendous name above the door = harmony.
post #4363 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

That's not a brick loadbearing building, moron.

Well, aren't you just a little ray of sunshine...
post #4364 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

No. That's a recipe for disaster.

no, we have been doing that for 20+ years and I'm yet to hear anything bad.
post #4365 of 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Looks like telephone switching-station from 1950s with a horrendous name above the door = harmony.
And from the same man came the Flatiron Building.

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