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The Architecture Thread - Page 231

post #3451 of 3574
David Chipperfield
Valentino Concept Stores
2008-2013

These are the Paris and Milan stores. I was going to post all three of these new stores he did, but his New York store just opened and I can't find a photo set of it for some reason. I'll post some when they're published. It's worth a visit if you're in the area.

Paris


















Milan

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post #3452 of 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

David Chipperfield
Valentino Concept Stores
2008-2013

These are the Paris and Milan stores. I was going to post all three of these new stores he did, but his New York store just opened and I can't find a photo set of it for some reason. I'll post some when they're published. It's worth a visit if you're in the area.

Paris


 

Why doesn't the pattern line up?

Was the floor not poured in place?

 

Looks like shit.

post #3453 of 3574
Because it's not made of wallpaper, you stupid fucking moron.
post #3454 of 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


Feeling like Antonio - That's a great house and the choice of materials is so well done, inside and out.

 

I do not have an issue with that kitchen at all. What don't you guys like about it? It looks great, avoids high/ hanging cabinets, the island is superb, it is well integrated in the space - I'd love to entertain in it anytime. The slats on top don't bother me at all (Assume it is AC?). Only thing I might do differently is the fridge placement.

 

Mike

 

Edit:

  1. Was slow in reading you guys earlier responses on the kitchen as to proportions off between kitchen/ table/ stairs and low chairs on island. Yeah, I don't see all of that at all. Sat on many restaurant counters that have a similar set up and never bugged me as the concept of openness and view is still there. I am not the tallest but never had the feeling of sitting in front of a white wall
     
  2. As for proportions, don't see that either and think it is just right how they divided the room and how it integrates into the larger context of the stairs dividing dining/ kitchen area from the living room.
     
  3. Where do I apply for the job as housekeeper/ cook?

Edited by mbaum - 8/25/14 at 12:02pm
post #3455 of 3574
I think consensus is better fridge.
post #3456 of 3574
I hate most of these kitchens. Even on projects I otherwise love, I'm satisfied with about 10% of them. The owners of these expensive houses all have money and naturally want lots of amenities in theirs, which complicates the space planning further and makes it near impossible to pull off coherently. The kitchens I usually do like the most are very rudimentary, practical shortfalls aside. It makes you wonder how Palladio would have dealt with a dishwater and a convection microwave.
post #3457 of 3574
The only amenity I like looking at in my kitchen is my espresso machine, but that is because it makes espresso for me.
post #3458 of 3574

Do you even think the kitchen in this house is too busy? I might have chosen to not do an L, a smaller footprint/ under counter fridge and maybe a different AC solution (If those slats are indeed for AC). Apart from that, I do like the overall simplicity and also can live with the counter. 

 

Would you favor an approach that might be closer to what, say Pawson does with kitchens? I likely would. I can imagine though that kitchens can be a tricky part for an architect and an owner building a house, given the balance of functionality and design. I agree though that I would be the first to sacrifice on practicability for a more coherent design: I am not a cook and only need space for the caterer ;-)

 

Mike

post #3459 of 3574
The one sacrifice I'd feel obligated to make for the sake of design is the large fridge. I'd go with a smaller refrigerator underneath the counter, likely with glass doors. Crouching over to fetch butter is far preferable to having a huge ugly fridge that fucks up all the lines of the room. Since it can only be about 6'3" tall feet, and since suspended cabinets can only be about 5'9" above the finished floor, you're dealing with two incongruent sets of lines. Add a counter at 36" and now you're detailing with a third horizontal benchmark. Then you have to design around water with wet surfaces, which have to play off the rest of the kitchen's materials, which is a problem because each material has its own geometry.. Then you have to deal with appliance geometry and find a way to organize the cabinet geometry around it. Then you have the line at the top of the cabinets. Then maybe a range hood. Then the kitchen table height. It's just a mess. If you keep everything below the counter, you have practical tradeoffs, but you have one important horizontal line that all other visual aspects of the kitchen can be designed to coordinate with. It makes it so much easier. That tall fridge with 80 lbs of frozen chicken cutlets is the source of all your problems.
post #3460 of 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Crouching over to fetch butter is far preferable to having a huge ugly fridge that fucks up all the lines of the room.

If you're fucked up in the head.
post #3461 of 3574
The kitchen is fine. As usual the squiggly lines in SH's head overrule function, to the detriment of any practicality.
post #3462 of 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

This is a very convenient and functional kitchen for the intended user: the cook and other servants in the house. The seating area is obviously for the staff, not for the owners or guests of the house.

As usual the squiggly lines in SH's head overrule function, to the detriment of any practicality.

But why does it have to be that fridge? Could they not have built it into the same cabinetry? 

 

Otherwise, I like everything else. I prefer a lower eating bar to a higher perch and the difference in counter height doesn't seem like much of a barrier between those seated and those standing. 

post #3463 of 3574
Client REALLY wanted an ice maker.
post #3464 of 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Client REALLY wanted an ice maker.

They have those on the inside of the fridge too... 

post #3465 of 3574
Yeah but they wanted the water/ice dispenser on the outside. Convenience.

Plus there's the issue of what's available where they are.

What is troubling is the seating area. I really did think that it was a wardroom for the household staff. Then I reviewed the other photos and realized that it's supposed to be a main dining area.
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