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The Architecture Thread - Page 226

post #3376 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
 

 

Could always do what the ancient Romans did and execute the architect who designed the faulty insulae or domus. 

wouldn't the collapse be the fault of the builder?

post #3377 of 3634
Particularly lol:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

Also consider how wealthy the USA, and yet how bad its Gini coefficient is.

Loathing, you strike as someone who is proud of knowing a few things but who utterly misunderstands them.
post #3378 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Dog-eat-dog cultures don't foster corruption. The proximity of a sizable group of intelligent, powerful, and wealthy people to an even more sizable group of dumb, hopelessly powerless, and poor people does. The relationship between countries in Europe and their corruption shows a pretty straightforward relationship between the lack of corruption in Northern/Western Europe and their small, broadly well-educated, and ethnically-homogenous populations while the most corrupt countries in Europe are the southern countries, which are mine fields of unfavorably dissimilar demographic groups, placing the highly educated in patronage of the minions. To be exploited, one must be dumb enough to fail in preventing it.

As a 10 minute stroll through New York could tell you, the magnitide of those conditions in New York could surprise nobody who learned it was the most corrupt city in America, even with Chicago's heroic efforts to supplant them.

Not impressed. You appear to be conflating inequality with corruption.
post #3379 of 3634

There is a lot of bad political science in everything both of them said. Not worth pointing out all of it. 

post #3380 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Just to state the obvious, in case it isn't obvious: corruption is hardly the only obstacle to effecting optimal regulatory policy. Even incorruptible, well-meaning rule makers and rule enforcers are not omniscient.

I am not familiar with how architect licensing really works, but I am not principally against the notion of professional licenses. To the extent they efficiently provide valuable market information, they are a good thing. Hairdressers and janitors perform low risk jobs so the cost of instituting a licensing regime is probably not worth it. People tend to care quite a bit whether their houses collapse on their families, though.

NYC has these lovely high minded people that think every stupid piece of shit 50+ yrs old is a landmark, completely impeding progress & growth.

Lets save the stacks in the NY Library!!!! They're useless? Who cares!!!
post #3381 of 3634
Some people like old shit that is repurposed.
post #3382 of 3634
Yes, but now we're talking zoning and discretionary permits. If you want to see the exemplar of bullshit reactionary zoning, come to San Francisco.

But what's the connection to certifying architects?
post #3383 of 3634
Who cares, can we look at buildings again?
post #3384 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Yes, but now we're talking zoning and discretionary permits. If you want to see the exemplar of bullshit reactionary zoning, come to San Francisco.

But what's the connection to certifying architects?

The connection is the issue of optimal regulation.

Even when regulations, such as zoning laws, are implemented by well-meaning, uncorrupted people, they can still be extremely wasteful. After all, they determine a priori how a particular resource should be allocated, although the best, most wealth-producing use may not be something conceivable by rule makers.

Professional licenses make it harder (or legally impossible) for unapproved people to do a particular job. Thus, similar to zoning laws, licensing regimes can misallocate resources by filtering out people who would otherwise be great at the regulated profession.

On top of all that, regulations are administratively costly.

That all said, regulations are not bad, per se. All laws are effectively a form of regulation. However, we should be mindful of weighing their costs versus their benefits. More critically, we should realize that human beings are bad fortune tellers and should not pretend they know how to tell the future or decide what is best for others.
post #3385 of 3634
Seriously guys I come here to witness SH's angsty sack clothe and ashes antics not to read second rate political psycho-babble. That's what we have the CE for.
post #3386 of 3634
Hey, you guys and the powers that be let the big kids take over the sandbox. Whenever that happens, sooner or later it's going to get dominated by shoptalk.
post #3387 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Hey, you guys and the powers that be let the big kids take over the sandbox. Whenever that happens, sooner or later it's going to get dominated by shoptalk.

If you think you're one of the "big kids" I'm going to hernia myself laughing.

SH, please present a building I neither really like nor understand. K'thanx.
post #3388 of 3634
Here is a palate cleanser;

-11.jpg

Nicely restored Mies Van Der Rohe stair railing.
post #3389 of 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Seriously guys I come here to witness SH's angsty sack clothe and ashes antics not to read second rate political psycho-babble. That's what we have the CE for.

Second rate? wtf
post #3390 of 3634

I enjoyed the discussion, thought the points were very well thought out and on topic (This is an architecture threat after all). But maybe time to discuss a house or something? I quite like that one.

 

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