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The Architecture Thread - Page 166

post #2476 of 3692
BEST OF 2013

Not a good year for large projects.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Hiroshi Nakamura
Optical Glass House
Hiroshima, Japan
2012





















Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

smile.gif

Ferran Visozo
Church of Corbera d’Ebre
Terra Alta, Tarragona, Spain
2013


Theory need not apply.





















Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Fran Silvestre Arquitectos
Life Ain't Fair
Calpe, Spain
2013

























Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Takuro Yamamoto
White Cave House
Kanazawa, Japan
2013























Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Reyes Rios + Larrain Studio
Baboc House + Renovation (Agave Fiber Factory)
Yucatan, Mexico
2013






























Before Restoration:





post #2477 of 3692
A couple more worthy bumps...
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Hans-Jörg Ruch
Chesa Andrea
Madulain, Switzerland
1999


4094

2690

3950

4928

4966

3950

3509

3497

3948

3048

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Hans-Jörg Ruch
Chesa Madalena
Zuoz, Switzerland
2002


9997

3309

3050

3050

3049

3050

4063

2706

3044

3500

3044

3085

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Hans-Jorge Ruch
Chesa Sclarida
S-chanf, Switzerland
2008


2962

3590

2962

2962

2692

4066

5025

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Alberto Campo Baeza
Offices for The Junta de Castilla y León
Zamora, Spain
2012


Notice the detailing of the windows and how the mullions align with the paving stones within a perfect grid. It's an exhaustive attention to precision you just don't commonly see. It takes considerable ability to control and process all the different layers of geometry and engineering within a single, cohesive building plan like that. Very impressive.

2079

1065

2033

2002

2045

3050

3073

2065

3050

2085

2034

4083

4028

1702

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Ruinelli Associati
Barn Renovation
Soglio, Switzerland
2012


2027

2027

4042

2033

2033

2057

2027

2027

2027

2027

2027

2027

2027

4042

4042
post #2478 of 3692
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Ferran Visozo
Church of Corbera d’Ebre
Terra Alta, Tarragona, Spain
2013

Classy preservation.
post #2479 of 3692
I don't seek out this stuff elsewhere, but I enjoy seeing it, so thanks for posting SH.
post #2480 of 3692
Thanks for reposting the optical glass house. That is a beautiful space. I'm also keen on the barn. Would live there.
post #2481 of 3692
post #2482 of 3692
Nihon Minkaen Open-Air Museum
20th Century reconstruction of original Edo-Period traditional architecture (17th-19th Century)
Kawasaki City, Japan
















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Edited by StephenHero - 12/30/13 at 12:24am
post #2483 of 3692
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Nihon Minkaen Open-Air Museum
20th Century reconstruction of original Edo-Period traditional architecture (17th-19th Century)
Kawasaki City, Japan



Lovely photos.

Unfortunately, such architecture is becoming increasingly rare in Japan and period houses, rather than being renovated, are typically knocked down and (instead of being replaced by architectural pieces such as those featured in this thread) are typically replaced by prefab boxes that degrade quite quickly and look worn out in a couple of decades.

The main reason is cost - traditional Japanese buildings take a lot of time and effort to maintain and to repair.

My grandmother-in-law lived in the Japanese countryside and she used to have a traditional farmhouse with an old-style bath heated by a wood-burning stove, an open fire-pit in the living room floor and a thatched roof. My father-in-law paid for her thatched roof to be replaced back in the late 1970s or early 1980s (well before I knew them) and he later told me that it cost as much to re-thatch the roof as it would have cost to build a brand new, pre-fab house (most contemporary Japanese houses are at least partially pre-fabricated before being assembled on site).

Unfortunately, her son (my uncle-in-law) later had the old farmhouse knocked down and had a new house built. It's more comfortable for her to live in, but has far less charm!
post #2484 of 3692
I would like to believe that contemporary Japanese architecture's overwhelming absence of hand-crafted eccentricities or rustic-ism is purely a temporary economic condition, but I'm kind of doubting it, which in my opinion is kind of troubling. Contemporary architecture is increasingly becoming a form of anti-materialist asceticism, but in a cheaply shallow way that does little more than mimic traditional Japanese architecture's lack of stuff, while neglecting the spatial purity that underlies its use. I don't think any other country is as homogeneous in its support of non-individualized contemporary architecture, despite the fact that they have the most skilled architects in the world by a considerable margin. Even in other countries with high building costs, the architecture still generally shows an aspiration for individual identity and cultural continuity that is largely missing in Japan. There are almost no figures I'm aware of that have made any traction trying to resist the homogeneity of white sheet-rocked interiors with shitty aluminum window frames in the way that an architect like Wang Shu has in China, despite the similar conditions both countries face in the rapid loss of traditional architecture. If they're lucky, they can afford to use some wood, but that's where it stops. It's almost like an overzealous approach to using architecture to convey a self-inflicted modesty towards their peers. Obviously with the talent they have to design and the wealth of the country there will be some great minimalist designs which I show here a lot, but that's because they use space and emptiness to promote a spiritual quality to the setting. In most of these shitty prefab homes you see, it's like they lock themselves in their homes with a dinky potted plant and cheap prefab table from Ikea and call it a day. I'd think there would be a few outspoken contemporary Japanese architects that were trying to instill some forms of ornament or rusticity into their designs to create individualization, but there simply aren't. I hardly ever see a grotesque, ostentatious Japanese interior ala Labelking, which can only really be possible if people largely resist that on a philosophical level, which isn't necessary. Even in the lamely homogeneous U.S., we've fortunately had the few proud eccentrics that start nailing shit to their home just to assure themselves a distinctive identity, but the lack of similar projects in Japan gives me the impression that defeatist attitudes kind of rule of there. God love em, but I think they need some ambition.


Jesus, grow some fucking balls.



A far more heroic, yet rare effort:



icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif


Edited by StephenHero - 12/30/13 at 2:07am
post #2485 of 3692
Have you seen Muji house?
post #2486 of 3692
The Muji houses are smart and admirable for what they are, but it's what people [don't] do that kind of drives me nuts. They just sort of stop right about here, with a few mass produced pieces of shitty furniture. They rarely offend in the way American home interiors do, but they overwhelmingly show complacency in plastic and mass production. It's hard to see stuff like this and then read Rach's longer posts on Japanese culture and not easily identify with the purgatorial spiritual rot he talks about. One of the overlooked aspects of Japanese architecture and aesthetics is its traditional embrace of imperfections and impurity in the aging of its materials or secondary furnishings like pottery, but you sure as hell wouldn't know it from looking at all the Japanese stuff in Dwell.


Edited by StephenHero - 12/30/13 at 3:31am
post #2487 of 3692
I believe the muji house comes furnished, but I see/know what you are talking about.
post #2488 of 3692
A better way of saying that is that there's almost nothing of this type of intricate and expressive detailing in Japan, despite its compatibility with modernist functionality and its historic prevalence in things like Japanese joinery and wall paneling that added character.












Edited by StephenHero - 12/30/13 at 2:43am
post #2489 of 3692
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


I could see this in my own house right now.
post #2490 of 3692
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Nihon Minkaen Open-Air Museum
20th Century reconstruction of original Edo-Period traditional architecture (17th-19th Century)
Kawasaki City, Japan


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)













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If they let me decorate it as I want, I would move tomorrow.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post



Unfortunately, such architecture is becoming increasingly rare in Japan and period houses, rather than being renovated, are typically knocked down and (instead of being replaced by architectural pieces such as those featured in this thread) are typically replaced by prefab boxes that degrade quite quickly and look worn out in a couple of decades.

The main reason is cost - traditional Japanese buildings take a lot of time and effort to maintain and to repair.

My grandmother-in-law lived in the Japanese countryside and she used to have a traditional farmhouse with an old-style bath heated by a wood-burning stove, an open fire-pit in the living room floor and a thatched roof. My father-in-law paid for her thatched roof to be replaced back in the late 1970s or early 1980s (well before I knew them) and he later told me that it cost as much to re-thatch the roof as it would have cost to build a brand new, pre-fab house (most contemporary Japanese houses are at least partially pre-fabricated before being assembled on site).

Unfortunately, her son (my uncle-in-law) later had the old farmhouse knocked down and had a new house built. It's more comfortable for her to live in, but has far less charm!

I doubt they are harder more expensive to maintain than the old castles, farmhouses we have here in Europe and they seem to thrive, as people want the charm and history, but it's most likely a cultural thing, which they are going to regret in 20 years.
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