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The Architecture Thread - Page 121

post #1801 of 3406
wtf, guiz. take your awful taste to the car thread.
post #1802 of 3406
Rare is the day in which when I come across a social housing project I'd actually want to live in. This is really outstanding. It takes a lot of wisdom to stick with something this simple and sensibly vernacular without imposing much of a creative footprint. Of note is the effective use of minimal wood accents to contrast what is usually felt to be the homogeneity of plaster and concrete. Dollar for dollar it's about the most effective little design choice you could ask for.

Ripoll - Tizon
Social Housing Project
Majorca, Spain
2013
























post #1803 of 3406
That is excellent. In addition to the wood accents, the treatment of the chimney tops is a great use of simple, inexpensive materials.

My only quibble is with the use of the open metal fences between the private yards. Apply some of that same wood there, and it would really increase the usability of those spaces (IMO, of course).
post #1804 of 3406






post #1805 of 3406
Stephen you are going to love this.

DSC_4886.JPG?gl=DK

Prices start at $4500 a sq.m.
post #1806 of 3406

Love this thread, just discovered it !

post #1807 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Stephen you are going to love this.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
DSC_4886.JPG?gl=DK

Prices start at $4500 a sq.m.

Where is this?
post #1808 of 3406
The Fourth Ring of Hell.
post #1809 of 3406
SH, what is your critique of the house I posted above?
post #1810 of 3406
Didn't see it.
post #1811 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Didn't see it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post







post #1812 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Didn't see it.

Did you see it? What's your opinion on it?
post #1813 of 3406
The architecture is alright. Lots of character, but some annoying detailing choices. It's a flawed product of its time. The junk on the shelves is really annoying.
Edited by StephenHero - 6/17/13 at 11:15am
post #1814 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

The architecture is alright. Lots of character, but some annoying detailing choices. It's a flaw product of its time. The junk on the shelves is really annoying.

Detroit's only Wright house, a cement two story Usonian.

I always thought Wright was considered better than "alright?"
post #1815 of 3406
He built some cluttered things. Many of his worst buildings are made of concrete, because he was trying to exploit its form-making potential in a structural way that was ahead of the construction technology that was needed in order to pull it off with a gracefulness we might expect today. In the case of this house, he's using precast concrete window mullions to support the living room's roof so that he could get away with not using an internal support column in the living space. This affords us the unobstructed view of the exterior windows, but again, the poor quality concrete required those mullions to be so thick that you actually get less light and less exterior views than if he had accepted the column and went with thinner mullions made of wood with larger glass panes. It comes across as chunky and unrefined. The checker pattern of opening windows he's using is also annoying, but for some reason I suspect that's not original, because it doesn't match the pattern of the ceiling lighting.

If you look at the house as an object of design, it's extremely impressive, so you can take satisfaction in all the geometry he's using, but it falls short for reasons of livibility. This often happens with Richard Meier as well, whose ability to control the design of complex geometry in his buildings is incredible, even if some of his spaces that result are just kind of meh and white.
Edited by StephenHero - 6/17/13 at 11:06am
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