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The Architecture Thread - Page 111

post #1651 of 3439

Skyhooks.

 

lefty

post #1652 of 3439
Archea Associati
Arntinori Winery
Chianti, Italy
2012


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post #1653 of 3439
Awesome. I'm ashamed that I managed to miss this last year while visiting Chianti.
post #1654 of 3439
Astounding. The metalwork is gorgeous.
post #1655 of 3439
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Archea Associati
Arntinori Winery
Chianti, Italy
2012


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Pretty impressive. I can't see how they can avoid raising their bottle price by at least $50 given what it must have cost to design and build that building, though.
post #1656 of 3439
As far as the actual construction of most of these places, is it mostly "specialty"-type contractors? Surely they don't let any old joe schmo with a hammer and nails go at something like that.
post #1657 of 3439
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Archea Associati
Arntinori Winery
Chianti, Italy
2012



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sloppy finishing, panel gaps everywhere.

doesn't do it for me.

post #1658 of 3439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot View Post

As far as the actual construction of most of these places, is it mostly "specialty"-type contractors? Surely they don't let any old joe schmo with a hammer and nails go at something like that.

For a large innovative project, most of the specialization is going to happen up front on the side of the material supplier and engineer (usually a third party), who will both be introduced early in the schematic design phase by the architect. The biggest engineering company for that type of work is Arup in London, who does a substantial portion of all the innovative work around the world, which this project broadly falls into. When the construction type is chosen by the architect, the manufacturer will go a long way to determine the actual design of building and the architect will be taking specs the manufacturer provides after a cost analysis. The actual construction will usually be handled by one of a handful of large corporate contractors with enough overhead to assemble nearly anything the material manufacture can provide. A firm like Turner would be a favorite if this were built in the States. For specific materials, there are few global suppliers of custom products that corner the market in each area. Lots of masonry products and glass come out of Germany and Nothern Europe. Japan is the leader in high performance structural steel. The Swiss specialize in high performance concretes and pre-fabricated composite constructions like insulated wood structural panels. The big metalworking firms that make custom cladding are in the U.S. Most of the specialists in each material employ engineers/designers that guide the design development and construction document phase with the local architect, who may or may not be the same firm that did the schematic design. That depends on the licensing of the architect in the area of construction, so you often have big name designers working with other local architects to do the construction documents and construction oversight.There are so many arrangements it's hard to generalize, but you'd often look at a project like this and expect it to be a collaboration between five or more firms, with the contractor being the least specialized. The exception to the rule in contractor specificity are civil engineering firms, petroleum engineering, mega high-rise construction, healthcare interior contractors, projects with extreme site foundation conditions, and other really technically rigorous sectors.
post #1659 of 3439
Marcos Acayaba
Helio Olga House
São Paulo
1990
















post #1660 of 3439
That house is awesome. Not sure I'm on board with the wood beam connection to the concrete pillars. I've seen how they strengthen a joint done in that fashion, but it still makes me uncomfortable.

One thing that seems advantageous to brazil; the wood local to the area is incredible.
post #1661 of 3439
I'll forward your skepticism to all parties involved.
post #1662 of 3439
Wow, sarcasm, I didn't expect that! The woodwork in that house is incredible. I'm enjoying how they did the interior wall panels.

I have to say, I appreciate when your contribution in this regard. I apologize for being excessively critical of you previously, I just found the tear down of other people's work to be distasteful (even if they did deserve it).

One of the most appalling characters I've met in my lifetime is an architect that found the need to be excessively critical of everyone's work, while touting his own 'ability'. He was old enough, and accomplished enough, that in my opinion he should have been past that. It's one aspect of the personalities of architecture that I find un-appealing.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 5/8/13 at 9:21am
post #1663 of 3439

One of the places we toyed with moving to a number of years ago was Wonderland in LA. But after we toured a few houses I couldn't get past the house perched on a hill instability factor. Not only did they look like they were ready to slide off the cliff, they felt that way.

 

That house evokes the same feeling in me. Could not live there.

 

lefty

post #1664 of 3439
It certainly is provocative.
post #1665 of 3439
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Wow, sarcasm, I didn't expect that! The woodwork in that house is incredible. I'm enjoying how they did the interior wall panels.

I have to say, I appreciate when your contribution in this regard. I apologize for being excessively critical of you previously, I just found the tear down of other people's work to be distasteful (even if they did deserve it).

One of the most appalling characters I've met in my lifetime is an architect that found the need to be excessively critical of everyone's work, while touting his own 'ability'. He was old enough, and accomplished enough, that in my opinion he should have been past that. It's one aspect of the personalities of architecture that I find un-appealing.

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