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The Architecture Thread - Page 11

post #151 of 3435
Unfortunately not. One architect who shows a bit of humour and historical awareness without losing his sophistication is the Italian architect Aldo Rossi. You might (or already) like his work. He's the architectural equivalent of the painter Giorgio de Chirico, a favorite of mine.
post #152 of 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maharlika View Post
StephenHero , Did Michael Graves design those?

In the post of mine above, yes.
post #153 of 3435
Of all the projects in the works right now, this might be my favorite. It's the Elbe Philharmonic in Hamburg by Herzog & deMeuron, the unquestionably greatest architects of today. It's a renovation of what was once an abandoned warehouse. This is the epitome of urban renewal in the 21st century. It adds to the historical context of a city's industrial past by reinvigorating the area with new use and activity. It's under construction now. It's breathtaking. There are some great renderings of the concourses on the official website as well as a great photo essay on the construction progress. I encourage them to be checked out. http://www.elbphilharmonie.de/index.php?language=en
post #154 of 3435
What I find entirely lacking in modern architecture today is detail. The grand scheme may be impressive, but such things as interior fittings and the like are entirely ubiquitous, insipid and probably cheap. I was recently in the Herzog & DeMeuron designed De Young and the bathrooms looked like anything in a suburban library and the door handles, etc. were incredibly generic looking. For this age of so-called individuality, there is not much individuality at all, which is all the more suitably ironic given contemporary criticism of say, how 1960s and 1970s Brutalism stripped away individual identity. I realize one of the tenets of so-called contemporary architecture is to reference the Modernists in their ideas of mass-produced design, but the organic, rather individualistic nature of the new architecture seems to refute such notions of standardization.
post #155 of 3435
What king of door handles were you looking for? Ones carved of oak adorned with sculptural serpents?
post #156 of 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Unfortunately not. One architect who shows a bit of humour and historical awareness without losing his sophistication is the Italian architect Aldo Rossi. You might (or already) like his work. He's the architectural equivalent of the painter Giorgio de Chirico, a favorite of mine.






Yes!

I have long been a fan of his work ....a truly inspired architect.

I love Sottsass too. He is a fascinating designer/architect. But I understand it is an acquired taste.
post #157 of 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
What king of door handles were you looking for? Ones carved of oak adorned with sculptural serpents?
Something other than that brushed aluminum found in every single hospital/administrative building/library.
post #158 of 3435
While on Rossi, he designed a watch for Alessi that my parents got me for my graduation gift. Probably not cool for SF, but it's a good conversation starter among architects I work with.
post #159 of 3435
Herzog & deMeuron are rock stars at the moment ....but I honestly find a lot of their work to be quite impersonal and unengaging.

I prefer Peter Zumthor, David Chipperfield, and Jean Nouvel.
post #160 of 3435
People like Paul Rudolph and Edward Durell Stone understood the ornamental impulse within a Modern aesthetic. Adolf Loos even designed the furniture for some of his buildings. Rudolph's original design for an apartment:
post #161 of 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
Something other than that brushed aluminum found in every single hospital/administrative building/library.
You're simply misguided if you think there is no attention to detail in modern architecture. Modernity is tied to detailing, in the process of reducing clutter in the sake of refinement. Architects painstakingly detail buildings to make sure lines are eliminated from construction documents. I'll show you the work of Jun Aoki as an example. His detailing is incredibly refined as are most Japanese architects (the best country for architecture by a nearly unmeasurable margin). The subtle textures he gets out of glass is prodigious. It can't be overstated how difficult this is to eliminate "seams" from construction.
post #162 of 3435
David Chipperfield

















post #163 of 3435
I am not referring to visual construction details such as you posted; I am aware of how obsessive contemporary architects are about subtle detailing. I am referring to things like door handles and toilet-paper dispensers. Everything is painfully generic. ------ Paul Rudolph's parking garage.
post #164 of 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by hypersonic View Post
Herzog & deMeuron are rock stars at the moment ....but I honestly find a lot of their work to be quite impersonal and unengaging. I prefer Peter Zumthor, David Chipperfield, and Jean Nouvel.
I actually toured Nouvel's office this past summer. A buddy of mine was working for him. He's got a great little compound in a Parisian alley. Chipperfield and Zumthor are great too. Zumthor's book "Thinking Architecture" is a must for architects.
post #165 of 3435
Chipperfield has a great new housing development in rural China. I've only recently become aware of how talented his office is. http://www.luxury-insider.com/Curren...zhou10-420.jpg
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