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The Architecture Thread - Page 92

post #1366 of 3271
There are actually two separate houses that are joined by that single, continuous counter, hence the two faucets.
post #1367 of 3271
I noticed that after I commented, and I think that would be a great way to handle a multi-generational household. Especially given that meals are a point of intersection in the lives of the people in such a family, this layout acknowledges that but still leaves the possibility of more separation during other times of the day. Good stuff.
post #1368 of 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

I noticed that after I commented, and I think that would be a great way to handle a multi-generational household. Especially given that meals are a point of intersection in the lives of the people in such a family, this layout acknowledges that but still leaves the possibility of more separation during other times of the day. Good stuff.

Also and easy way to borrow some sugar from the neighbor.
post #1369 of 3271

Wow.

 

How fantastic these houses are.

 

It's great if I could have a chace to go there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #1370 of 3271

 

LL_Carnegie57_CPSE_7.jpg
living_dining_crop.jpg
 
LivingRoomView_1440_crop.jpg
BedRoom_crop.jpg
MasterBath_crop.jpg
post #1371 of 3271
@Scott Disick

Damn that third picture, that would be an absolutely stunning view.

Now for something different:

Brighton Implant Clinic

Architects: Pedra Silva Arquitectos
Location: Brighton, England
Coordinator: Luis Pedra Silva
Team: Nuno Baptista, Jette Fyhn, Hugo Ramos, André Góis
Photographs: Joao Morgado

Behind the seemingly inconspicuous facade hides an incredibly futuristic dental clinic:

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post #1372 of 3271
I've seen enough white boxes lately, so I'm gonna start posting older buildings for a while. I've been more interested in Pre-Renaissance Christian, Orthodox, Byzantine, Far Eastern and Islamic architecture recently, as well as early modernist projects with an emphasis on oddities, ornament, and intricate details (Arts & Craft, Prairie Style, etc.), so I'd gonna spam this thread with that stuff instead.


Siena Cathedral
Siena, Italy
13th Century


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post #1373 of 3271

Shell House by Kotaro Ide 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shell House BathroomShell House Bench

Shell House InteriorShell House Kitchen

 

lefty

post #1374 of 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurens View Post

@Scott Disick
Damn that third picture, that would be an absolutely stunning view.
Now for something different:
Brighton Implant Clinic
Architects: Pedra Silva Arquitectos
Location: Brighton, England
Coordinator: Luis Pedra Silva
Team: Nuno Baptista, Jette Fyhn, Hugo Ramos, André Góis
Photographs: Joao Morgado
Behind the seemingly inconspicuous facade hides an incredibly futuristic dental clinic:

LOVE this kind of new meets old stuff. One of my favorite examples is the mall in old town Munich. Most of the buildings were destroyed, but they rebuilt the facades as they used to be, and behind them built a modern shopping mall with lots of cool modern architectural touches.
post #1375 of 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I'm gonna start posting older buildings for a while. I've been more interested in Pre-Renaissance Christian, Orthodox, Byzantine, Far Eastern and Islamic architecture recently, as well as early modernist projects with an emphasis on oddities, ornament, and intricate details (Arts & Craft, Prairie Style, etc.), so I'd gonna spam this thread with that stuff instead.


I like the direction this is taking.
post #1376 of 3271
If anybody needs a coffee table book for Christmas, this was my favorite architecture book from the last year. It wasn't a great year for architecture books, but this one didn't disappoint. Great photos and incisive text.

4062

2102

2015

2012

2009

2028

2011
post #1377 of 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

If anybody needs a coffee table book for Christmas, this was my favorite architecture book from the last year. It wasn't a great year for architecture books, but this one didn't disappoint. Great photos and incisive text.
4062
2102
2015
2012
2009
2028
2011

I'll try and pick this up.

I spent a good month in Japan this year, much of it in Kyoto where I almost ODed on temples, castles, and classic housing. I was most struck by the amazing variety of the architecture, even though Japanese architecture if often presented as a seemingly uniform thing in the west. In particular, the seamless transition from outdoor to indoor in many homes and temples was very impressive, especially concerning how old many of these structures are (though a fair amount of them have been rebuilt).
post #1378 of 3271
Yes there is quite a variety in Japanese architecture, but I think Katsura is famous in the west because of the modernist architects that visited and were inspired to create their early designs. Also, designs from Louis Vuitton are said to be inspired from the sliding doors in the tea house opposite of the main villa, and so on. I guess what makes Katsura so amazing is that although it is over 400 years old, it has so much influence on the modern architecture and designs of today.

The inside/outside flow, minimal space, understated luxury, lines, all of the major points in modern design are all clearly heavily influenced by Japanese architecture. Even modern furniture design like floating shelves probably were influenced by the old floating shelves you see in the temples and places like Katsura (chigaidana).

When you visit Kyoto, try to make a reservation with the Imperial Household agency so you can tour the Katsura Villa (and other Imperial villas).
post #1379 of 3271
The Pritzker Prize has just been awarded to an architect who at least 75% of architects have never heard of. Actually, I'm gonna 90% haven't heard of him.


Quote:
A Chinese architect who has forged a different path from the bland, suburban-style development in his nation's booming cities on Tuesday will be named the first Chinese winner of his field's highest honor, the Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Wang Shu, 49, deftly melds tradition and modernity, often by reusing bricks and tiles from demolished buildings in such bold new designs as a history museum in the Chinese city of Ningbo.

Wang calls his office the "Amateur Architecture Studio," yet that name is far too modest, the jury that selected him said in its citation.

His work "is that of a virtuoso in full command of the instruments of architecture — form, scale, material, space and light," said the jury, which mainly consists of architectural experts. This year, it included for the first time U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who has a keen interest in the field.

Given by the billionaire Pritzker family of Chicago, the award recognizes a living architect for "significant contributions to humanity" and comes with a $100,000 grant, a bronze medallion and a spate of worldwide publicity.


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Quote:
The architecture of the 2012 Pritzker Prize Laureate Wang Shu, opens new horizons while at the same time resonates with place and memory. His buildings have the unique ability to evoke the past, without making direct references to history. Born in 1963 and educated in China, Wang Shu’s architecture is exemplary in its strong sense of cultural continuity and re-invigorated tradition. In works undertaken by the office he founded with his partner and wife Lu Wenyu, Amateur Architecture Studio, the past is literally given new life as the relationship between past and present is explored. The question of the proper relation of present to past is particularly timely, for the recent process of urbanization in China invites debate as to whether architecture should be anchored in tradition or should look only toward the future. As with any great architecture, Wang Shu´s work is able to transcend that debate, producing an architecture that is timeless, deeply rooted in its context and yet universal.

Wang Shu´s buildings have a very rare attribute–a commanding and even, at times, monumental presence, while functioning superbly and creating a calm environment for life and daily activities. The History Museum at Ningbo is one of those unique buildings that while striking in photos, is even more moving when experienced. The museum is an urban icon, a well-tuned repository for history and a setting where the visitor comes first. The richness of the spatial experience, both in the exterior and interior is remarkable. This building embodies strength, pragmatism and emotion.

Wang Shu knows how to embrace the challenges of construction and employ them to his advantage. His approach to building is both critical and experimental. Using recycled materials, he is able to send several messages on the careful use of resources and respect for tradition and context as well as give a frank appraisal of technology and the quality of construction today, particularly in China. Wang Shu’s works that use recycled building materials, such as roof tiles and bricks from dismantled walls, create rich textural and tactile collages. Working in collaboration with construction workers, the outcome sometimes has an element of unpredictability, which in his case, gives the buildings a freshness and spontaneity.

In spite of his age, young for an architect, he has shown his ability to work successfully at various scales. The Xiangshan Campus of China Academy of Arts in Hangzhou is like a small town, providing a setting for learning and living for students, professors and staff. The exterior and interior connections between buildings and private and public spaces provide a rich environment where an emphasis on livability prevails. He is also capable of creating buildings on an intimate scale, such as the small exhibition hall or pavilions inserted into the fabric of the historic center of Hangzhou. As in all great architecture, he does this with naturalness, making it look as if it were an effortless exercise.
He calls his office Amateur Architecture Studio, but the work is that of a virtuoso in full command of the instruments of architecture–form, scale, material, space and light. The 2012 Pritzker Architecture Prize is given to Wang Shu for the exceptional nature and quality of his executed work, and also for his ongoing commitment to pursuing an uncompromising, responsible architecture arising from a sense of specific culture and place.
post #1380 of 3271
The History Museum at Ningbo

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(click for bigness)
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