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Considering a Big Physical Sale... - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
i'm thinking of giving my security guard 2 sets of brass knucks just in case. he's very menacing. i knew they did a lot of phone business, i just can't imagine to whom. true story: i bought a corneliani jacket from them one time, like in 1997 and i was in there 2 or 3 YEARS later and they had 1 left just like it, and this wasn't a basic jacket, very plaid and distinctive. they won't mark something down 60-70% to clear some old stuff out, just mark it on sale and if it doesn't sell, take the sale tag off and put it back to full retail.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
i really SHOULD do it near malouf's but my wife thought that that shopping center's lease might include restrictions on "same biz" kinds of stores.
Can you get someone to slip you a copy of malouf's mailing list? Or, is there some high-falootin men's club or country club or city magazine or charity or art gallery or something in Lubbock that might be willing to sell to your their mailing list? That might get your ad (in the form of a letter or postcard) in front of the target audience. Or, perhaps you could place an ad in that high-falootin city magazine.
post #18 of 27
You could always do a blowout for all of us loving StyleForum folks who would be more than happy to take some fine clothing off your hands at a steep discount Of course, we're merely trying to help. -s
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
we're members of the country club, so we have that list from the directory and that's in our plans. i'd LOVE to get malouf's list, but i'll also probably target some doctors around town that i know. i'd LOVE to sell it all to you guys, but given that i have about 1.35M at the retail value, it'd take a whole lot of purchases by you guys, but i'm willing.
post #20 of 27
Hi Lance Getting a bit concerned about your overheads now, since you are talking about running this at 70 percent discounts. So far we have: Venue rental, an ever increasing number of security staff, plus also likely some kind of security tagging and detectors as well (which could cost anything), credit card and register rental, presumably shelving rental, staffing costs, not to mention the marketing costs for DM/other means...which could run very high by the time you purchase the database, arrange the printing and arrange the distribution...and all in a relatively small market. This is why your clotheshorse is virtual to begin with, right :-) May I offer a completely random alternate suggestion? Conduct the sale at the country club, donating 10% of sales to some charity project the club is involved in (or to whatever renovation the club is doing at the time). Zero venue rental (your part of their agenda), youll still need to staff it of course, but they have security provided anyhow at the club, and since its for a good cause (ie them), members and guests unlikely to give you too much of a security problem, theyll market it to their database and through their bulletin boards for you, so it cuts your overheads way down. And if you dont sell enough...do the public one later. Just a thought Matt
post #21 of 27
My $.02 - for what it's worth... I would second the idea of renting a truck and going to Dallas or Houston - definitely get a lot more people. They have sales like this every once in a while here in Phoenix. I've never actually purchased anything, but they usually put an insert in the newspaper where they promote the sale as having brand name merchandise. Typically, they hold them in a store that's closed in a strip mall, like old Service Merchandise, Target or Walgreens locations - and they charge admission - either a daily fee or one price for the whole weekend. That way you still make money from the looky-loos. Of course, the sales that I've actually gone to check out usually end having "designer" stuff that is actually more urban streetwear, FUBU, South Pole, Timberland, etc (probably explaining why I usually pay my $5 and then don't end up buying anything), but I don't see why the same type of sale wouldn't work with the brands you carry. If people think they're going to get a deal, they'll pay admission. Heck, my wife just chaired the Junior League of Phoenix Rummage Sale that raised $110,000 after expenses and people not only paid $5 to get in, but actually waited in line to do so - for USED items. Good luck with the sale. Bradford
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
good idears, i actually considered the country club, only drawback is that it's outside of town, there would be no unintentional foot traffic. it's true the people there wouldn't steal from me, so that's good but it's a ways out of the way. i also considered going out of town, but that's down the line. i'm only considering doing this b/c i have SO much stuff and it doesn't sell fast enough online so i don't want to end up with 7,000 things since 2,500 items is already pushing me to the limit of space/time/consciousness
post #23 of 27
I'd vote for the Country Club concept. But the key is how you advertise the sale. A friend of mine has a little boutique which is only open for business one weekend a month. They've developed a really good mailing list and do a great business. I think they started with a country club list, and used a city directory to reach some of the "posh" neighborhoods. They send a hand-addressed postcard a week before each sale.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
my wife really likes the country club idea. i'll have to call them and see. i'm just worried about it being so far outside of the main part of town. i used to live about 1 minute from the club and it's not near anything
post #25 of 27
Quote:
my wife really likes the country club idea. i'll have to call them and see. i'm just worried about it being so far outside of the main part of town. i used to live about 1 minute from the club and it's not near anything
I think that you are going to get more sales from customers who view this as a "destination" shopping trip than from walk-in customers. Even at your admittedly very low prices, $200 for a pair of pants is still something most people balk at. The exception is a discerning customer who has expressly gone out of the way to get those $700 pants for $200. The other exception is a walk in charter member of the country club for whom $200 or $700 does not make that much of a difference. I agree with your wife. There are obvious savings in overhead in the country club idea, and I don't see that you have much to gain from having the sale in a heavily walked through part of town unless you are in NYC or LA, where fashionistas predominate. I assume that Lubbock is not such a place.
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
don't let the cattleyards outside of town or yesterday's 55mph wind/duststorms fool you. fashionistas are EVERYWHERE here.
post #27 of 27
I would say 90% of US public would not know Borrelli, Kiton, Lorenzini, and etc. Also they would not know the difference between those high end clothing and say .. Hugo Boss stuff. So as you said, even if you put $199 for Borrelli slacks, if people do not know what Borrelli is and it's workmanship, then they will think the pants are too expensive. Also, when I talk to people on clothing (my co-worker etc..), most people do not care whether a garnmet is made by hand or not. Basis on this, if I were to run ad ad campaign for such high end items, I would target clientels who already know those labels and qualities.
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