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Posts by TimelesStyle

Right. Would most likely come into play with family transfers (or situations where a car would be given away). However, my guess is that the requirement for a notary has more to do with ensuring people (such as the elderly) aren't having their cars essentially signed away without their knowledge and perhaps the DMV requirement/suggestion is there to ensure you aren't selling to someone whose license isn't valid. For example, just because someone has an unexpired license...
How's that add up to tax evasion? If anything, the state could argue that the opposite would constitute tax evasion; buying a car that's worth $50k but only paying $5k (since the $45k could be construed as income). Otherwise, the seller is never making money (unless it's a collectable car that's appreciated), so no actual "income" and the buyer is paying money (so again, the only other opportunity for tax evasion would be to try and claim more is being spent on a capital...
Does it say that it must be the notary at the DMV or could it be any notary (and they just suggest the DMV's because then the state collects the fee)? Otherwise, if you want to do it at the bank where you'll be depositing the check, see if they have one on staff (larger banks often do).
If they prefer cashier's check you could always have the sale take place at the parking lot of the seller's bank. Go in, make sure the check is good, then hand over keys and title.
I know that in many states it is the dealer's responsibility to make sure a buyer has insurance before driving off the lot; is it not the same for a private sale? Genuine question, I have no idea...
I would. Can't imagine that going commando in a tuxedo would be fun. Though in that case I'd suggest the silk variety
I bought these and they're gorgeous:http://www.barneys.com/crockett-%26-jones-kensington-loafers-503461727.html#prefn1=brand&prefv1=Crockett+%2526+Jones&start=33This is a nearly identically styled, but somewhat less expensive (and less shiny) option:https://www.paulstuart.com/men-s/formal-wear/noche-formal-slip-on.html
You mention Midwest, how far are you from Chicago? It's the sort of thing Paul Stuart might have, though their online selection is a bit limited. Also worth checking Morris and Sons, as they have a lot of interesting, odd dinner jackets (though they can be very pricy). I think your leaning towards velvet over silk is a good call for a couple of reasons. First is durability; silk can easily get runs. Second is versatility; this will probably get a lot more wear since it's...
That's fair. The irony, of course, is that she associates DB with "overly formal rigidity" when, in fact, the DB tux is typically considered less formal than a SB. However that's probably a losing argument in this situation .I like the idea of having odd DJ/trouser combo for a less formal event assuming the setting is right (more intimate type setting, in an old school "social club" vs. a DJ and neon lights). I think I'd also probably choose to go with the same color as...
One of my two absolute "musts" for our wedding was that what I wear was in my sole discretion, within the confines of whatever level of formality my now-wife wanted. Worked well as part of my overall "If you ask my opinion I'm going to give it to you and you'll have to take it into account but in 95% of circumstances if you tell me what we're doing I'll just go with it". The suit fell into the 5% (though she didn't care; she know's I've got good taste).Out of curiosity,...
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