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Posts by TimelesStyle

Lexus already seems to be attempting this with the LS600. BMW tried this with its first 7 Series hybrid, but has since scaled it back to a six-cylinder with more modest number. However if looking at a 7 I can't imagine why you'd buy the hybrid for fuel economy when the diesel-powered 740Ld bests it in terms of fuel economy. Not sure what the 0-60 is on the hybrid, but the diesel does it in under 6 seconds including the added weight of the long wheelbase and AWD.
If you're taking that position, you cannot look at formalwear in a vacuum and have to look at men's fashion (the part involving suits, at least) on the whole. Far less has changed between 1920 and now than changed between 1875 and 1920. So, if our suiting styles are still largely based on those of 80-100 years ago, so too should our formal styles. All those guys did really was bring formalwear into the 20th century by progressively phasing out the tailcoat and making...
Or there's still the GL550, which is somewhere in between the "new" 450 and the AMG
Just for the heck of it, started thinking of all the cars that used to be available in the US market with eight or more cylinders and N/A that are no longer (excluding special "high performance" versions of certain vehicles listed). Some have been downsized, others discontinued. Shed a tear for some of these : Mercedes E Class Mercedes M Class Range Rover Land Rover Discovery/Defender Jaguar XJ (even had a V12) Volvo S80/XC90 Ford Explorer/Lincoln Aviator Lincoln MK...
But diesels are a different matter, as everyone has always turbocharged diesel engines, and MB hasn't ever done much with diesels larger than six cylinders. BMW and VW/Audi, on the other hand, used to offer a significant number of V8 diesels in the flagship models (Audi still does) with the latter even offering a V12 TDI at one point in the Q7 (and VW a V10 TDI in its Tourag). Unless you're talking about something different.
And there must have been some serious advances in turbo technology recently because 10-15 years ago, they were pretty rare to see on gasoline powered cars that weren't either GT cars or cars made by VW, Audi, Volvo or Subaru.BMW gets a partial pass only because they still offer the full range of engines in all of their lines (even though the M3 and M5 were downsized from V8 and V10s respectively). However this is the first time in 20+ years that the company has offered a...
Do you give the A8L W12 a pass, since it seems to be Europe's last N/A full-size luxury car with more than six cylinders?Almost feels like MB is moving back to the days where the C and E classes were one line (190, 300/320, 420/500). The new C has gone way up-market compared to its predecessor, the E has lost its non-AMG V8 (in the States at least; sounds like it's still sold as the 500 elsewhere) and it wouldn't shock me if there was near complete engine commonality...
I'm confused; was there an RS6 prior to the C5? You say the first gen was Avant-only, but a few posts later say that you occasionally see C5 sedans...
According to the Wikipedia article I posted it looks like there were only about 1,500 C6 sedans made during its two years of production, which explains its relative rarity.
IMO, every M model after the E39 M5 has been so horribly, excessively over-styled that they look like aftermarket tuned franken-bimmers. The E39, though, is one of the most beautiful cars ever to come from BMW. I think it may also have been the last M model to come with an old-school manual gearbox as the one and only option.
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