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Posts by ClambakeSkate

You guys are bumming me out, so I'll just leave this here...
The constant variable is that skilled makers are dying off (literally) and the ones left can charge whatever they want. Even in China... 10-15 years ago it was super cheap to produce in China, but since then they've realized that they have all the power because they are the only ones willing to do production and have raised prices A LOT in the last 15 years. A good example is Martin Greenfield. What would happen if, one day, Martin Greenfield decided he'd had enough,...
This is the post that I had so much trouble with...And here I am...OK, Sorry, Zara was not the best example and I used it a bit hyperbolically, but still, their model is very strong. When they own the factories, they cut one mark-up of their product out of the pricing equation. That's huge especially when each step of mark-up comes in at around 3X.And I can use smaller companies as examples that operate in this same way, in fact, many of the brands you mentioned fall into...
I'm sorry @LA Guy but your whole post is so flawed and infuriating I don't have the time to dig into at them moment. Maybe tomorrow.
That's not true.The system is the problem. People (designers and consumers) just assume that this is the only way to work. That's not true. The reason that Zara is so sickeningly successful is because they own EVERYTHING. They own their own factories but they also own the shipping companies, the fabric mills, the button suppliers, etc. EVERYTHING. If smaller companies opened their eyes and stopped being sheep and just did things the way that everyone else does and learned...
Plain and simple the big problem (and reason for outrageous pricing) is that most "designers" can't make a goddamn thing themselves. They're only stylists. Not creators.
Yeah, I suppose you've answered my question. It requires rich people who care about their clothes and who don't need to or want to wear suits all the time... So... not too many people. I've considered cosplayers as well as an alternative client base but I think there is an unwritten rule with cosplay that you need to make the costumes that you wear. And I'm not a part of that world so I decided to keep my distance out of respect. The idea of the 'local clothes-maker'...
Does the current market support custom clothing work, realistically? And I'm not talking bespoke tailoring... I've been asked to make stuff in the past by friends and in the end they usually want better (more complicated) versions of currently available styles from other brands at 1/4 of the price. When I tell them that the price will likely be more than what the other brand is charging (because I am not running a chinese sweatshop, nor do I have the fabric buying power...
Yes, agree fully on film. I had a friend set up a game where I had to shoot my progress through certain tasks with a disposable film camera. It was a lot of fun anticipating the film processing and instantly I started searching for a film camera since I'd sold mine off a few years back. I ended up with a Olympus 35RC because it fits in a pocket and supposedly takes nice pictures. I've got the first roll about half way shot guessing on the exposure (sunny 16 rule) so I'm...
Those look like 017 which run true to size (at least the pair I have do)
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