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Posts by ShaneB

Quote: Originally Posted by thenanyu What if I got payed for every 2 hours of work? What about every 4 hours of work? At what periodic interval would I transition from wage to salary worker? I don't really know whether yours is a genuine question or you're being ever so slightly facetious - Quote: Employment law does not provide a specific definition of a wage or salary earner. However, generally speaking, the term 'wages' is used...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire Houston, we have a troll on the radar. Grow up. Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire It was fun playing. Again, wage and hour laws determine what positions may or may not be salaried. Have fun playing in the troll park without me. By all means retreat...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire No, I said a consultant gets an hourly. You may have to pay them part or all even if they do not complete a particular task. This has been fun but for all business purposes the definitions of the wage and hour laws define who may and may not be a salaried employee and it has zero to do with a "professional ethic." 'Professional ethic' isn't stipulated by any national or supranational body - what type...
Quote: Originally Posted by thenanyu I write software for a living, as does my colleague sitting next to me. He gets payed an hourly wage. I get payed a salary. I am a professional. He is a labourer. Got it. I equally have a good friend who writes software who works in the same fashion as your friend: he, like your friend (I presume) is a freelance developer, i.e., he is a consultant and professional. I'm really at a loss as to why so...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire No, but it will slap your ass with huge fines if you don't follow the guidelines to determine who is and is not exempt. What becomes clear is that you have never had your own P&L to concern yourself with. I've only just read the link you provided and have no idea what you think it proves. Needless to say, a wage is defined as an hourly or job specific form of payment, a salary is a periodic form of...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire So the metric of dollar per hour is not the problem but whether one refers to it as a "rate" or "wage?" Why that makes perfect sense. Using smilies doesn't effect an argument... And yes, there is a difference: just as you say that the consultant receives his or her rate for the completion of a particular task (through their expert advice or input) rather than a specified wage that is indexed...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire A handy little link to the Department of Labour's website stating who can an cannot be an exempt (salaried) employee. http://www.dol.gov/elaws/esa/flsa/screen75.asp No where does it mention a special ethic. Yes because it's enormously funny that a government body doesn't detail a sociological and economic idea... hilarious...
Quote: Originally Posted by Piobaire So then consultants are not professionals, they are labour? Btw, Wage and Hour actually have a definition of "exempt employee" and what properties of employment are needed. Needless to say your definition does not match theirs. Who knew? They'd say that a consultant falls in line with the moral and ethical stipulations of the professional. Nobody says they receive an hourly wage , they say they receive...
Quote: Originally Posted by thenanyu I don't know how you manage to be an elitist condescending ass and feel so self-righteous about it. What about folks who do piecework? Untouchables I suppose. With all due respect, you can pick any book that details the history of business in the western world, or for that matter, the development of capitalism as an economic system - I'm certainly not one for abstract principles or poncy intellectual...
Quote: Originally Posted by thenanyu Then go be a banker, outperform all of them, and make your millions. Thanks for this completely irrelevant point. I can criticise an occupation without my self being a part of it, or indeed, without myself ever wanting to be a part of it.
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