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Posts by Avocat

Paris is a must. It's one of the jewels of the planet, being the start of modern (Western) civilization, thought, law, culture and art (i.e., Charlemagne). Sadly, there is a problem in Europe -- no borders. The Roma (and their dogs) and illegal immigrants, predominantly from middle-eastern countries huddle all over but especially in Paris, which gives them sanctuary. France believes in "humanity not expulsion", but has switched direction (a thorny problem everywhere). I...
+1 on Rome and Boston Legal both. Star Trek: just when I started to get into the last one--Enterprise--it was over. I failed to appreciate Voyager at the time it aired. (A shame, since I've enjoyed watching re-runs of it since, though laugh a bit today sometimes when I see re-runs of TOS which as a kid I truly loved). I agree with Manton that DS9 had pretty much run its course (it was a good series), but was sad to see TNG go. (I know, certain actor(s) left and/or wanted...
A student in the U.K.? How very exciting, and congratulations on the commencement of your studies! Yes, generally speaking, e-tailers must accept a return of items you're not satisfied with when buying over the Internet. Each place has its own rules on this, and in the UK it's the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000. These regs recommend a return period of 7 working days, within which the consumer can return their goods without giving a reason. This...
Quote: Originally Posted by DeCaloFashion1 The Jerk IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later.       I AGREETIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the...
Quote: Originally Posted by CDFS Correct. I'm afraid I haven't seen much SNL, due to me living outside of the US. I have heard posters lament about SNL's decline in funniness. I.e., it must have been funny once. SNL’s only shown to audiences in North America? Pity! Yes, I agree that SNL was funny in the past (fresh, talented writers, perhaps?). Most of the original SNL cast went on to enjoy successful film careers. These comedians include:...
Quote: Originally Posted by Jodum5 Though I still remember it clearly because my friends laughed at me for the mistake, it's quite likely she was just a biatch. Don't really care though. Yes, I understand completely and agree. I truly hope that you did not leave her a tip (again, you did nothing wrong; also, it's not like you called her "Garcon" (boy), right?). Your observation is bang-on and correct, and I doubt she's still employed in the...
Quote: Originally Posted by CDFS (Better) Gostbusters made me laugh. Another one is The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou Braindead (come on: perfect, now that I'm out of the "wearing of the far too many hats to count" mode ... and found the "edit" function Life Aquatic, being the movie about the shark with Bill Murray, right? I like Bill Murray's work also. Do you remember SNL (original cast) with him and Gilda Radner doing the news-spoofs...
Quote: Originally Posted by willpower Anyone else get the inner voice "this chick must dig me" signal when a woman holds a door open for you? Quote: Originally Posted by willpower I think being called "ma'am" is interpreted by a woman as an offhanded slight, implying that she looks old enough to be called "ma'am". But what are the alternatives - "Madam"?, "Lady"?, "You hot little piece of ass"? I'm guessing the last one...
^^^ Really? It's actually proper in most places where they speak French (i.e., France, Quebec, etc.) to refer to men (including waiters) as Monsieur (Mister) and women as Madame (Madam). In days past, Mademoiselle (miss) was used to refer to young women (i.e., under 30) and only then if unmarried, but not in Quebec where--since its founding--everybody's a "Monsieur" or "Madame." [Note: these terms were actually titles reserved for those without any actual title (i.e. below...
Hmmmm, let's see: My Cousin Vinny, which I found to be amusing and enjoyable; but as to really funny? For me, I'd have to say A Fish Called Wanda. I saw it in the theatre, and I remember people were actually laughing so hard that they almost fell out of their chairs. I also enjoy Monty Python but, at the same time, have an appreciation for British humour of the dry sort. And +1 for the Mel Brooks and Steve Martin films mentioned above, with honourable mention also going...
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