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Posts by austinite

I have to do a long week (50-60 hours) about once a month, but I get directly paid for it. Also, the duties that require the long hours are usually technical challenges which are the fun part of my job. Personally I wouldn't want a purely salaried job that required regular overtime unless it was already built into my pay (ie: making > 100K) and I draw that line as a 24 year old with no family obligations. If they can't be reasonable, find a different job.
Just out of curiosity, are you out of college or still in school? Getting a job at Google is pretty damn difficult. This hypothetical French Lit student would need very good grades, an excellent resume, and fantastic interview skills. Maybe he/she didn't go to an Ivy League school, but you are talking about a similar caliber of person nonetheless. 95-99% of undergraduate humanities majors will not fair this well.I might as well make up a hypothetical mechanic that makes...
My response is that the mechanic's job could very well pay more. I agree that shitty office jobs frequently require a degree. I don't think the humanities BS would be able to get a job as anything more than a receptionist, call center person, or MAYBE a commission-based sales role at this software company unless they had an enormous amount of hobbyist software experience. I will grant you that one can certainly move up the totem poll once they get their foot in. My...
I hope you aren't referring to my post as a rant against majoring in the humanities. I have absolutely nothing against the study of the humanities, and am very happy that it exists. I simply believe that an 18 year old who believes that going to a university to study the humanities will improve his employment outlook is very misguided.It should be said that I went to a highly ranked university, but one that is a very large state school. I can certainly see how someone...
I'd tend to guess that most of the people on that list went to extremely elite schools. No question a humanities graduate from Harvard is employable. I was talking about the the other 90-95%.
I think the problem is at the undergraduate level. Students, who were frequently high-achievers in HS, graduate with a BS in a subject of the humanities and have no real job prospects available. The reality is that they are now less employable than their low-achieving high school classmates that have spent four years working full time. Graduate school offers a path to hide from this reality for another 4-8 years. Going to a university to study the humanities is...
Hospitals get to pass internal costs directly to the patient, and the patients don't see the price until after the service has already been rendered. What is the point of being efficient?
I am almost certain that the answer to this is yes. As a generalist degree MBA pretty much destroys everything else, and it's also the standard path to several of the high demand careers like IB. To me, your interests don't appear focused enough to warrant a masters (nothing wrong with this), but I could be misreading it.
I'm not in the field but I was under the impression that IB analysts are hired out of undergrad. If you can't get those internships/jobs, and want to work in IB, then you should plan to get an MBA after 2-5 years of working and come in at that level. (I believe most of the analysts will end up going the MBA route themselves.) From a financial perspective I think straight-out-of-school master's degrees are only going to be useful for a health profession or engineering...
One of my friends did an Econ minor just to mix in some interesting but more relaxed classes into an engineering curriculum. In hindsight I think that was a great idea and I would have loved to do the same. In terms of job prospects, however, I don't think a minor will open a single door for you. It MAY be useful to differentiate you from an otherwise identical candidate (and such situations are frequent in the current economy), but it's not going to make you eligible...
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