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Posts by austinite

I'm a 25 year old professional, I buy various index funds in $2-3k chunks for my retirement, "someday buy a house", and "someday start a business" savings. I like it better than trying to pick stocks for sure. I would never invest any money that you absolutely know you will need in the stock market, though.
If you are only making $60k/yr now, I don't understand why you think you need to make $250k/yr for it to be worth it. You could probably get six figures post-MBA without too much trouble, and that difference would pay off the degree rather quickly. I think the general consensus is that an MBA is not worth it purely for education (ie to help you run your business.) You will definitely learn extremely useful things, but it's not worth 100k+opportunity cost until you add...
Patent law seems like it would be unbelievably boring to me. I'm not a lawyer but I have worked on filing a few patents. It might just take a certain type of brain.
You are right, that is very unscientific. At my university students involved in the Greek system had significantly better GPAs on average than did non-Greeks.Like others have said, I wouldn't put it in unless you did something REALLY special.
Agree with everything you said here. The issue is that the current system encoirages students to go down these dead-end paths. There is also a lot of knowledge that is obvious in hindsight but completely missed by 18-20 year olds. There needs to be better career education at the high school level (and not "Everyone here needs to go to college to be successful").The biggest issue however is student loans. We need to identify this bottom 90% and prevent them from getting...
You are really getting out of your element here. People in electrical and computer engineering programs study programming and computer science in significant depth. Many of these people take jobs at software companies and, *gasp*, write software for a living. That you are unaware of this should probably disqualify you from having an opinion on the matter.Regarding your chart, I'm not sure what I'm supposed to be looking at. The raw number of "mechanical engineers" has...
Who do you think is responsible for integrating electronics into usable devices? For example, perhaps it's true that "a few" electrical engineers design a certain microcontroller (debatable, define "few"). But who is responsible for implementing that microcontroller into cell phones, vehicles, airplanes, mp3 players, oil rigs, air conditioners, washing machines, ....., pretty much every other device in the world, .....The answer is more electrical engineers.Yeah, no...
I believe well over 50% of the my EE class switched majors or flunked out before graduation, and I had moments myself where I was close to switching. For me, however, it was mostly immaturity at 18-20 rather than anything related to my major. It's debatable how good of a career working as an electrical engineer is. I think it's an interesting job that is a good path to six figures in 40 hrs/week, but It's not as high upside financially as some other things. That being...
I think you are a bit off. Pretty much every single device that humans use now contains significant amounts of electronics. People with electrical engineering degrees are the ones designing these devices. You probably personally interact with 100 different embedded systems in a given day, and thousands more indirectly That is a lot of electrical engineering work. EE is also probably the single most versatile degree in terms of landing jobs in other fields. An EE...
I've had a interview that advanced as far as you described, and then ultimately ended with the hiring manager never contacting me again. Very strange, but unprofessional shit happens sometimes. Doesn't hurt to send a follow up 2 weeks later
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