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Posts by NameBack

Yeah I don't think it will be close. Only chance Stanford has to keep it close is to keep Oregon's offense off the field with an effective run game, which miiiight be possible given the extensive injuries on Oregon's defense.One thing I hate about being an Oregon fan is that even when UO is #2 in the nation, ESPN can't be bothered to cover them at all. Same problem, not quite as bad with KState. The top two teams in the nation get perfunctory coverage, and then it's back...
In the game against Cal they hardly relied on the run at all. Barner only rushed for like 65 yards.I mean, I wouldn't go as far to say Cal "shut down" the run game for Oregon, but clearly Kelly decided it would be faster and easier to just let Mariota go for it, and the kid threw 6 touchdowns.But I basically agree with you. He hasn't been truly tested in a "the game depends on it" kind of way. However that might happen with Stanford on Saturday. No 1 rush defense in the...
Hardly. Your understanding of MMT is shallow at best.
By this logic, real wages would necessarily decline during any period of inflation. And yet...Now, note something important here -- I'm using real compensation, not just wages, since for the last 30-40 years healthcare has made up an increasingly large percentage of how workers are compensated. I think that's troubling and needs to change, but if we're trying to answer the question of how much stuff can an hour of labor purchase, we have to take into account non-wage...
Yes, you seem to have some pretty strong opinions about it. Why don't you throw out a number? Just tell me it'll be over X%.
Why should money keep its value?Here's the thing; I don't care what my dollars can buy. I care what my labor can buy. When one hour of my labor can buy more stuff than the year before, then I don't give a shit how many dollars that labor is denominated in, because it doesn't fucking matter.Inflation is completely irrelevant because wages rise with prices, and as long as there's real GDP growth (which is going to be more likely if we're in a stimulative, loose monetary...
I watched the first half of that interview, and I don't know what alternate reality you were watching but Mike completely demolished Karl.Karl was talking entirely out of his ass with complete disregard for any empirical reality. He talks about nominal GDP increases but ignores real GDP increases and starts talking about indexing inflation exclusively to corn and gas -- which is pretty much the sign of a lunatic.Also, his write up is basically correct, but at the same time...
Furo, the thing you seem to be forgetting here is motive.Why would the president or his administration even care to leave this until after the election? How exactly does a Republican general's infidelity in any way blowback onto the president?It doesn't even make sense. Why go through the trouble of covering something up that isn't even going to harm you politically?
I actually think there's a good bit of money to be made right now by buying into this dip. It's all panicked anxiety about the fiscal cliff, and will subside once a compromise is reached. I think people are overestimating the likelihood that the cliff results in any kind of actual economic harm.
Meister I'm still waiting for your over-under prediction of CPI in two years.
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