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Posts by nutcracker

Cool, sorry for the mixup.If you're looking at the same data I"m looking at above, then 1744 out of the 3113 centenial businesses in Japan are Sake distillers and vendors, 759 Wooden constructors, 569 kimono manufacters.541 Hotels / inns, and 674 landlord/rentors.Anyway, not much to do about shoemaking, sorry.
Unlike swords, Japanese forge welded tools are mostly 2 piece constructed, with hard steel exposed on one side and abraded flat. While kiridashi is an all purpose blade, blades could be made in a myriad shapes and relative thickness (to a degree) to suit various profession. Not saying that they are any more practical, nor usefull, and certainly not cheaper, compared to the European (Swedish?) knives that are the norm for even the Japanese shoemakers, but if someone...
One fun thing you may want to look at is Japanese kiridashi knives, which I believe are perfectly suitable for shoemaking. I think I have seen several shoemakers using Japanese kiridashi knives (not sure what specific function)As you know, the Meiji Restoration heralded the ban of carrying swords and also heavily restricted the manufacturing of swords. Hence many great lines of swordsmiths either went down, or they went on to making other forms of metalworks, such as...
You may be talking about high end atelier-based workshops that often carried on the names of the master (Kenzan I, II, III and so forth)But also keep in mind that the vast majority of crafts created in pre-modern Japan were not made by high-art crafts ateliers. Local utilitarian crafts were often made in artisan villages as a communal activity, and almost never carried names of masters. Local crafts traditions (folk crafts or so called mingei in Japan) were able to...
If you don't limit your definition of "crafts" to something derived from the West in the past 150 yrs or so, yes Japan does have an impressive resume of crafts preservation. In terms of numbers (according to this magazine I found), Japan currently has 3113 operating businesses that have existed for 200 years or more. That accounts for 43% of such businesses in the world. Germany comes next at 22%, and France at 5%.Out of the 3113 companies with over 200yrs in business,...
You must mean the Teishitsu Gigeiin (Imperial Craftsman?) system that recognised artists and craftsmen (doesn't include culinary or performing arts). National Living Treasure system replaced this after the war.I haven't heard that the French MOF is based on this though.
Talking about Japanese shoemakers taking off to the world, Our good buddy Atsushi Qnai0-san, aka IL QUADRIFOGLIO, will be having his first HONG KONG Trunk Show, along with a very very talented tailor SARTORIA KAVUTO (formerly at Liverano & Liverano) March 11 ~ March 13 @ KOWLOON SHANGRI-LA HOTEL By Appointment Only I plan to be at the event to assist the two gentlemen, so I hope to see some SF members in Hong Kong!!!! FOR APPOINTMENT: Email:...
Perhaps the best is to call them 078 641 1341I have a feeling they tend to avoid overseas mail because don`t really know how to write in English.I suppose Koji knows enough English to communicate over phone.
Btw Turn Right Shoes / Kamioka's predominant B2B customers are Japanese brands. They make shoes for REGAL, as well as for a slew of other J brands under Mitsui Shoji, and others (I heard also Union Imperial), all in their growing shoemaking complex in LAOS. Not sure if those shoes are finished back home and stamped with Made in Japan
This one is from a way back, a high end RTW sample for CORNO BLU by CENTRAL shoes, Tokyo. Unfortunately, these high-spec shoes (with nicely shaped waste/sole) didn't make it to the shop floor. I think Seigaku san opted for less expensive, open channeled sole RTW shoes.
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