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Posts by Belligero

My pleasure, glad you liked it!Here are another few tidbits if you're into this stuff:watchmakingblog.com on Rolex's special gasketVelociphile on balance wheelsIt's regrettable that the latter blog is no longer being updated; a bit of detail on how stuff is made is a welcome break from the usual sales-pitches-disguised-as-reviews.
Here's an unobstructed view of that movement, unusual clous de Paris decoration and all:image source: rolex.comI'm not sure what to make of the pyramid-styles, but I definitely don't see any quality issues.Y'know, that deficient-finishing myth is a very pervasive one; when I started getting into watches, took it as a given that Rolex movements were crudely-finished things due to all the casual racism against them from certain internet-expert types. Contemptuous comments...
It's entirely personal preference, but I have a big wrist and I don't have any problems going even smaller than that with some of my old watches. My tastes have changed over the years, too; my first decent watch was a 38.5 mm Sinn 356, which I initially found very disappointing, but now I think it's spot-on for a pilot's chronograph and I wouldn't want it any larger.This ad was supposed to show how the gigantic watch is more macho or something, but I think the smaller one...
Go for it! I'm really pleased with mine so far; it's an understated watch that I don't find boring. (But please bear in mind that my taste in watches is questionable.)This isn't my photo, but it's identical to my OQ right down to the dial colour — as well as Dino's and Non Serviam's. I think the design has aged well:image credit: Old Expat Beast on TRFThe movement offers something a bit different, too:image credit: MaggyPee on r-l-x.deIt was the lowest-production Rolex...
Nah — that's bullshit, man. Not hardy compared to what, a G-Shock?The cal. 3000 found in the 14270 model has had some criticism because it isn't the prettiest as far as decoration goes, but it's a well-engineered movement when it comes to function. Its reliability and toughness are at the top of the heap among mechanical wristwatch movements, and the same goes for the earlier 1570 and later 3130/3132 calibres. Although my preference in an Explorer would be for the earlier...
Aw, thanks! Having an insert option or two really increases the versatility of the watch, as the highly-saturated red and blue can sometimes be more colourful than I want. The black inserts tend to fade to an appealing blue-grey over time, and go especially well with a plexi crystal. GMTs' reds and blues can turn into all kinds of hues, some of which are likely chemically-induced — as are some of the asking prices.Indeed, GMT and Submariner bezel inserts are a sub-genre of...
PS — I kinda like this photo of the Ferrari chairman wearing one, too:
I've said it before... but if I had to pick just one, it would be the GMT:The blue and red insert is my favourite, but it only takes a minute to change the look:So I guess you could say that I'm a fan.
You should be able to fine one in great condition for that price. The ones I'd consider nice seemed to be around 10 or 11 K last time I checked, give or take.I think it would be a great choice as an everyday watch, by the way, and the prices will likely stay very strong for that model. To me, the 4030-movement Daytona offers a great combination of looks, practicality and collectibility. It's a special watch, but not so special that you can't actually wear the thing, ya...
Good memory; that sounds about right. Odets describes in detail the defects and what he sees as cost-cutting in that particular movement. The thing is, I have a friend who's a full-time watchmaker, and although the 3000 isn't his favourite calibre from the company — "...but it's still a Rolex movement, so it's limited how bad it can be" — he hasn't yet come across one with those flaws. I'm not sure what happened to the one in the Odets review, but the mention of damage to...
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