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Posts by Belligero

Thanks, Dino!You're absolutely right; the dial is the core visual element in a wristwatch, and one in which every detail counts, regardless of the style. While some manufacturers seem to be content to settle for less-refined execution these days — hey, people still buy them, right? — just consider the influence that small differences on the dial can have on the future desirability. A different colour of printing, the addition/deletion of an item, or subtle changes in...
That made me crack a smile. Since the original Mussolini's-military-commissioned Panerai watches from the 1930s used Rolex Oyster pocketwatch cases with lugs soldered on, you can kind of see where they were going with that idea, but it's still pretty contrived in my opinion.
Thanks! That looks like a closer match — the "M" in particular. The 5140 dial lacks the indent at the base of the tail on the "R", but that, along with the rounded corners, could simply be due to what appears to be sloppy printing. [[SPOILER]] The more I look at that dial, the worse it gets. The spacing, alignment and angles are a total mess. It's painfully obvious on the numbers, but the letters are mangled, too; check out "NOV", "MAR" and "WED" especially. You can really...
Very nice.Offhand, I'd say that Rolex, Nomos and A. Lange und Söhne are currently doing the best job among the more well-known manufacturers with the use of type and lettering on their dial work, and each house has its own distinctive style. There are some smaller-production independents such as F. P. Journe and Greubel Forsey that have shown a great degree of skill and attention to detail in the field as well, but I'm sure I'm omitting a few.On the other side, it's not...
Crocs with a suit, dude... crocs with a suit.That's the level of faux-pas we're talking about here. That 5140 dial is the exact horological equivalent of this:I wish I was kidding, but I'm not.
Look, it's not about hating Arial, as crappy and lame as that typeface happens to be. There's no emotional component involved, and it's only a symptom of the real problem.The issue here is that they're so obviously illiterate in what ought to be their core fluency. It wouldn't matter if you commissioned Adrian Frutiger himself to create an ode to his home country of Switzerland in the form of the most elegant and brilliant wristwatch typeface ever conceived; once you...
You could do that, but a suggestion that they improve their design competency might be a more constructive way to begin. THEN WE DO THE SMASHING!And here's our rallying cry:Watches:
Looks to be about the right size for the content to me; it's nice to be able to see the details.I think you'll do well to hang on to those classically-drawn (vs. MS-Paint-drawn) Patek Philippes of yours. For me, it's pretty clear which dials involved the services of a skilled professional, and which ones were produced after the boss's wife was appointed as head of design.Anyone that bought into the "A Patek is forever" "You never really own a Patek" line for their new...
Come on; you know that looks great! Patek used to get this stuff consistently right; that's exactly how it's supposed to be done.Obviously not done by the IT guy, either.
Spot-on, V!You’re damn right that I love a good discussion of typography, and you’ve chosen some excellent examples. I agree with your conclusion, as well. The older vs. newer Patek dials are vastly different. The new one is not an improvement in any way.To understand watch design, one needs an appreciation and solid understanding of the art of typography, as the principles are so closely related. In both cases, you’re combining function and æsthetics to communicate....
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