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Posts by Belligero

Hey dudes. Nice new thread you got here. Confession time —I'm starting to think that I may have too many watches: There's also a GMT II on permanent loan to my dad, an extra OP and OQ, plus a bunch of others that I don't get around to wearing much. But for now let's just focus on the pictured ones. I should probably cut back to about three, which is still probably excessive, but the problem is that I really like all of 'em for various reasons. The Deepsea is still...
^ 15.5K € plus a Panerai isn't exactly the deal of the century for a used 15202. Anyway, this is not a difficult decision if a new one can be had for about the same price.
Cool, nice to see that you ended up getting one!I was very satisfied with the Daytona when I first got it, and my appreciation for it hasn't diminished over the intervening three years. The combination of wearability, versatility and quality that it offers is outstanding among chronographs; there really aren't many out there that are rugged and waterproof, yet slim and refined. And the 4130 movement is really something special.Technical stuff aside, it just never seems to...
I think the one super-thread thing is unique among watch discussions. Although there may be advantages to a separate area for the subject, there's also the possibility that it will become like every other watch forum. Either way, it's been a hugely informative and engaging discussion over the years. Thanks to all who contributed.
No need to take it in just to size the bracelet. You can take out links yourself with the right size of optical slot screwdriver. The fine adjustment isn't very challenging, either. (A proper spring bar tool helps, though.)
Serious Eats is a quality site. It seemed to me that the article was more about the culture surrounding espresso than the drink itself. My (admittedly limited) experience with espresso in Milan is that, while it's a great cultural element, the coffee itself isn't anything special; its roast level tends toward "incinerated" and it's heavy on the cheap robusta beans. It's for good reason that they almost invariably put sugar in it.It's fast, it's cheap, and you don't drink...
Nice. I've been using the Mini-E for almost five years now and I love it. My previous grinder was a full-on industrial-capacity Fiorenzato and I don't find that the quieter Mazzer gives up anything in grind quality. Enjoy; that's the type of purchase that only has to be done once, as it'll likely outlast you.
I was there this summer and I thought Tandem Coffee on King E and Trinity knew what they were doing and had seriously good coffee. I'm sure there are plenty more, but that was the only memorable one I found near the Pan-Am athletes' village.
Nice; Peruvian beans can be excellent. I picked up some Bolivian beans at the beginning of the month that didn't taste too special with my default routine on aeropress. I would have kept the impression that they were mediocre, but I tried using a lower brew temperature and they were fantastic. Using unfamiliar beans can be a good opportunity to experiment and tune in one's technique. As long as the growers care about what they're doing, I think any region is capable of...
^ It's unfortunate that Brazil is saddled with the reputation of being a high-quantity, low-quality producer. While that's certainly true of the vast majority of their production, I've also had exceptional beans from a few Brazilian specialty producers; Tim Wendelboe is notable for the effort he's put into bringing some of them here to Norway to prove that they're not all commodity-grade. African-grown coffees still tend to be my favourites, but it's always nice to have...
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