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Posts by mikecch

Quote: Originally Posted by wj4 All of my Aldens are quite heavy. Perhaps it's the wood mid-sole and leather sole. Quote: Originally Posted by commodorewheeler All Aldens are heavy, it's probably due mostly to the steel shank. The midsole is cork, not wood. Quote: Originally Posted by pebblegrain fucking christ, it's not wood Quote: Originally Posted by sazon Correct. ...
Quote: Originally Posted by Crane's 15 ounce leather. OK 15/64ths of an inch. We don't sell saddles so nothing in that thickness. The closest thing we have would be Filson bridle leather belts and they would be around 12 ounce leather. I will agree with you about the need for splitting leather to get a workable thickness for small leather goods. The problem is in the definition of top grain and how it's been perceived in the market place. True bridle...
Quote: Originally Posted by Crane's Full-grain leather refers to the leather which has not had the upper "top grain" and "split" layers separated. The upper section of a hide that previously contained the epidermis and hair, but were removed from the hide/skin. Full-grain refers to hides that have not been sanded, buffed, or snuffed (as opposed to top-grain or corrected leather) to remove imperfections (or natural marks) on the surface of the hide....
^ That would explain it perfectly... Although potentially confusing and misleading to consumers, it actually makes sense as splitting the leather doesn't affect the grain - and thus, the grain is still 'full'? So, Wolverine boots are made of top/full grain CXL that have most likely been split, haha
IMO 5mm would be uncomfortable, too thick. Some folks don't even like their belts to be that thick, let alone shoes The splitting process basically involves cutting the leather through the horizontal plane, slicing away some of the corium, thus making the leather thinner (to be used on bags, shoes, gloves, wallets, etc.) Done via a big machine - there are some videos available on YouTube showcasing the processes at various tanneries around the world - a few of them...
Quote: Originally Posted by Crane's Well I know they are full grain. I sell these boots and have talked to the people at Wolverine about all the what where hows and whys. See the chart below.... Well, I'm a leather hobbyist and have talked to various leather craftsmen and tannery folks around the world, and I tend not to take product specs as gospel. But of course when the hide comes out from the tanning pit or drum, it would be full-grain. I...
^ Full grain cattlehide is 4 to 7 mm depending on cut and age, they surely must split some of the corium off unless they're using little calf? I just saw and tried on some 1k boots (brown CXL) yesterday, the outshell is definitely not full grain adult cattlehide thickness - can't imagine a 5 mm outshell to be very comfortable.
The top-grain (not full grain) CXL for boots usually don't have these scuffs straight out of Horween. It's a chrome-tanned and veg. re-tanned leather, so while very versatile and rugged, it's not really fine leather
^ Nice! Could expand on the buying tips by incorporating methods of discerning quality/character of denim and construct of jeans. I think I've also written about similar topics in the past - but it's always good to have some understanding of a merchant's perspective
Quote: Originally Posted by Epaulet Not really - the dark brown horse will be exactly as it was for Fall '11 The Black Horsehide is amazing too. If you guys didn't notice, I very rarely make anything in black leather. In many cases, black doesn't have the depth or interest of the equivalent skin in brown. Not so with this horsehide. The black horse is gorgeous. It's got an awesome finish - not as glossy as shell cordovan, but with a deeper lustre...
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