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Posts by flanker2000fr

After a long phase of Panerai and JLC, I've been wearing a fair bit of Rolex vintage or transitional models, recently:
Quote: Originally Posted by Odd I/O What brand of rubber soles are those? These aren't my shoes, but I have the exact same soles under all of my shoes. Don't know the brand, unfortunately. Maybe you could drop a line at the Cordonnerie Duret, rue Duret Paris 16 (phone should be easy to find).
Quote: Originally Posted by ralphwho a little on the heavy side though: looks and feel forgive my ignorance but where are they made (Weston's in general) and why the french cult- is the brand french owned? Yes, they are French owned, and made in Limoges, in the heart of France. The chasse / demi-chasse / traditional loafer are rather on the conservative side. But the brand has done a pretty good job at renewing its offering. You still find...
Quote: Originally Posted by fritzl I typically stick with rubber soles during rainy days... Careful!!! Are you insane? DWFII will soon explain to you that, because of the rubber sole, the insole is rotten to the core and full of bacteria from hell. You'll soon catch gangrene and your feet will fall off. It's a fact.
Quote: Originally Posted by fritzl no offense, this is a discussion around the emperors beard. i hear you walking, though. I'm not sure I understood that. As for DWFII's assertions, they are rather amusing: calling people armchairs scientists, questioning fellow cobbler's credentials, and then going on listing "facts" that he has observed. Could this be any more subjective? If these were such well known facts, we wouldn't be discussing them...
Quote: Originally Posted by fritzl there was no need of a second party to detect the damage. it started to curl and grab into the leather sole. hard to describe and i never made a picture. this happened after two or three wearings, which is strange enough. just trying to understand, either. you bought them with leather soles and had rubber installed then? in the case you have a two digit rotation this is hard to comprehend. it seems to be a routine...
Quote: Originally Posted by fritzl i had it happen. bad luck, maybe? certainly, the shoes could have been saved with a leather sole and still go strong. Did a cobbler tell you that, or is it an assumption you made? How did the rubber outsole compromised your shoe? Just trying to understand. I have +/- 20 pairs of high-end shoes with rubber outsole, some for 15 years, and none of them ever encountered any issue. Still going strong.
Quote: Originally Posted by Nicola Differental drying. If you take a material seal one side all the moisture will have to leave the other one. You ever place a piece of meat in a hot pan and see it curl up? You won't see a shoe change that way but it can't be a good thing to seal one side and force all the moisture out the other. Nicola, the insole is already sealed on one side by the use of glue / rubber in the cork filling between the insole...
Thanks Nick. I see you are a cobbler by trade, which goes to confirm what a number of cobblers have told me on that topic. As you rightly point out: it is merely a question of preference, eg functionality vs. looks. Now, hopefully, this will finally debunk the myth that inserts will eventually destroy one's shoes. I highly suspect that EG, and others, advise against them as they hope for customer to bring their shoes back to them for re-soling. At twice the cost...
I can understand that some people would find rubber inserts aesthetically unpleasing. It is true that they make a sole slightly thicker and that might be a turn-off. But as for the fact that they damage the sole in the long run because they prevent the sole to breath, it is simply a mis-conception, illustrated by the following: "Moisture will always move from wet to dry unless it hits a barrier like the Topy and then it stops moving and additional moisture just builds up...
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