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Posts by Blackhood

It's funny you say that - I'll watch reviews and discus them down the pub for hours on end, but I'm just about to replace mine and I really don't feel that strongly about what I get as long as it feels like good value. It's almost like cars exist on two planes - one abstract and one physical.
Sort of reminds me of very early Bugattis.
BRB - going to buy a golf cab. It's funny, my dad is in the market for a new A5 next month, then after that I'm going to need a new car. I was looking at a used CLK or a TT (I drive 15 minutes to work, so don't need anything very comfortable), but that A3/Golf might work well.
I sort of meant based on the platform. The shape of the Golf is too blocky to really suit a chopped off roof.Shit - I've blocked the existence of the beetle from my memory.
Maybe it's an impression that was true 20 years ago, and just stays with me because I heard it so often. I've always found Golfs in particular to be hard to kill (my mother drove two when I was a kid, both hit 150,000 miles and 15 years old before we gave them away to family members). Here, at least, they hold their value better than any other small car. You could tell the rich kids at school because they turned up in second hand Golfs rather than the usual Corsa or Clio...
I actually wish VW would expand their ranges. I'd rather like to see their approach to a small convertible based on the Golf GTi, and I feel like they could do well in the slot between the £25k Passat and the £55k Phaeton. They've always made bulletproof cars that are quite understated - some kind of sleeper-executive-saloon could do quite well.
I'm certain that I'll be thrown into a loony in for this, but I quite like it. It reminds me simultaneously of old Saabs and my Cessna 182.
I love Astons but that is a money pit, and the most 80's looking car I've ever seen. It'd be like hooking up with the prom queen once she's 50 years old - you want it on behalf of your younger self, and then you have to deal with the problems caused by a hard life and low maintenance.
I sort of get that, but there are names in there like Ferrari, Maseratti and Bugatti that even non-enthusiasts know. The bit that I find confusing is that someone spent the time and energy to build the collection, but never tell their loved ones what it was worth, even from a cultural point of view.
I never understand how this happens - that lot would cost at least a million dollars, even if each one was picked up at bargain prices. Does the wife just think "I'll leave him to his little hobby" imagining that this stuff is worthless? The collector then dies and the family believes that cars are like snuff boxes, collectable but valueless? I can't imagine being rich enough to buy them, but absent minded enough not to mention them in a will or insurance document....
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