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Posts by shoefan

I believe it is a membrane that covers the muscles in the horse's rump, underneath the skin. Hence, it is not made from the animal's skin/'hide,' unlike virtually all other leathers I can think of. Technically, I'm not even sure that it would qualify as a leather, though it is a tanned body fiber. The process of tanning is what converts rawhide into leather. Tanning causes the collagen in the skin/hide to cross-link and change characteristics so that it won't...
Just one correction of the above (obviously DW knows this): hand welted shoes use a shoemaker's (or saddler's) stitch, in which two continuous lengths of thread weave in/out of the material being sewn, such that even if one of the threads breaks, the other remains intact. In a lock stitch, like that sewn by a sewing machine (or inseaming/GY welt machine, or an outsoling machine, such as a Landis), one thread is fed from the top of the seam and the other is fed from...
Nicholas: Nice work. A couple of questions: it looks like you used a shoemaker's stitch to sew the upper to the insole. Any reason for doing that vs. a simple whip stitch? Did you cut any feather on the insole to make it easier to stitch it? Also, I think you or JerryBrowne referenced a change to the lasts for the derby style, vs. an oxford. Just curious what changes you make -- e.g. a bit higher cone/less concave shape across the joints, or what? Thanks in advance.
That apron looks hand sewn to me (split and lift stitch?). Likewise, that toe seam appears to be hand sewn (stabbed seam); it could also have a machine sewn stitch further holding the two pieces of leather together at the toe (hidden on the underside of the seam), as it seems to me that those showing stitches might not be sufficient to prevent grinning in the toe seam.Just a guess.
Edward Green calls the 'tunnel' stitch (I believe the technically correct term is round-closed stitch) the 'skin stitch' for the toe seam and also the apron seam on their hand-sewn models like the Dover. In fact, these two stitches are different; in the toe seam, it is a true round-closed stitch, as the thread travels parallel to the leather surface on both sides of the stitch/both pieces of leather, and it exits/enters both sides into the thickness/edge of the leather. ...
I think it is mainly aesthetic. However, it also serves two additional purposes -- it makes it easier to last the toe of the shoe, as the curved seam reduces the amount of excess leather around the toe; and, it can be more economical, as two smaller pieces of leather can be used (inside and outside), rather than one large piece of leather. Because of the way the pieces are laid out, cutting can be much more efficient in the use of leather.
Well, I am of a mixed mind about this. The problem/issue is that the two business models (RTW/‘factory’ and bespoke) operate at such different volume levels (both in aggregate and at the individual model level) that the production processes are dramatically different. I will grant you that the upper shown in the picture is far from perfect. It is, however, another question as to whether it should have been rejected and the shoe remade with a new upper. I think it is...
I don't need to do this experiment to know the answers. We are dealing with two things in this experiment: water absorption, and water evaporation. I believe in both instances, for the same material (in this case insole leather) the rate of each will be pretty much linearly related to the surface area of uncoated/non-occluded leather. (I imagine there is a bit of non-linearity introduced to factor in the requirement for internal wicking/water transmission when much of...
I must admit, I don't quite understand what the point of this analogy is. Also, as you point out, it is not a perfect analogy in any event. Furthermore, water can and will enter the hose, it just cannot exit it. With pressure 'behind' the water, the water will enter the hose and compress the air in the hose, so the hose will have some water and some air in it, reaching an equilibrium when the water pressure and the air pressure are equal Of course, because air is...
I have a number of musings on the topic of linings, sweat, etc. First of all, for mw313, what is the percentage of foot's sweat glands that are on the sole of the foot vs. the sides/top? My impression is that most of the foot's sweat is from the sole (akin to the palm of the hands); assuming that to be case, doesn't the insole matter much more than the lining? For the water/sweat that is generated by the sides/top of the foot, in some sense wouldn't it be best if the...
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