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Posts by shoefan

I hear you and I respect what you are saying. I imagine, for people who really care about what they are doing, they would like to learn and even master more skills. Both of the 'makers' I spent time with in the UK were practicing 'closing' in their spare time. Likewise, I imagine they have tried other stitches (Goiser, Norvegese, pump) even if they've never been asked to do so. However, that does not necessarily mean they have plans to try 'closing' for paying...
Like in any pursuit, there are some who care passionately, and others not so much....If one believes that the solo craftsman is a superior model due to 'connecting,' then where does one draw the line. Should the shoemaker also make the lasts? What about tanning the leather? Spinning a hemp or linen thread from the fibers? Raising the cattle? Growing the flax or hemp? Is it the case that the more one does, the more connected one is to the final product? And, does...
Yes, therein lies a choice. It is my opinion that having people who specialize leads to better results most of the time; I've spent time with various specialists (last makers, closers, 'makers') and the speed and skill they demonstrate are indeed impressive. I've spent 10+ years (albeit not full time) trying to learn the breadth of shoemaking skills, and I am nowhere near as good as any of the folks. There is real value in repetitive effort. That being said, there are...
If you compare the "P' stitch, which is most analogous to a square awl aligned perpendicular to the welt, to the "VR" stitch, which is most like an angled square awl, you can see the latter stitches lay in a straighter line, so perhaps there is something to it. Also, remember that we are dealing with a shoemaker's stitch, not a lockstitch, and the threads may be a lot tighter fit, so I'm not 100% sure the lay of the machine stitch is the best indication. Interesting to...
I don't think so. If so, wouldn't you do it symmetrically? The consistency of the angle looks like a fudge wheel to me.No, not sure. I'll see if I can figure it out. I think it has to do with making it easier for the stitches to run in a straight line. On the other hand, it might slightly weaken the seam, since you are rotating the holes and thereby slightly lessening the distance between them. Imagine rotating the awl 90 degrees, then you'd be really weakening (or...
I am guessing he has a fudge wheel with angled teeth. I think it would be hard (impossible?) to use a typical fudge wheel to get this angle, as the wheel would need to keep running off the edge in order to achieve the angled grooves. Notice how the angles go from right to left on the left side of each of the Crup shoes? One one shoe (the left), the left side is the outside of the shoe, on the other (right) shoe the left side is the inside. One fudges the same direction...
Interesting fudge wheeling of the welt. I've never seen the fudging angled like that. It is generally perpendicular to the edge of the sole/welt, rather than angled as shown here. Definitely looks weird to my eye.I've read somewhere that the square awl should be angled when stitching the outsole, so perhaps the angled fudge wheel helps the maker align the angle of the awl?
Well, first of all, I never wrote that I don't use a pedograph....However, if one makes a fitter, then one can compare the width of the insole, on the actual foot, at the joints, and then use that as guidance for modifying the last. In my personal case, I've made a last with the insole width (feather line to feather line, across the joints) corresponding to my pedograph; that has, in fact, turned out to be wider than I actually need, when my foot is in the shoe. Is that...
I didn't say that the two foreparts, including toe spring, are identical. If the toes are at the same height when the last is at the correct heel height, then their toe springs match (at least as I understand the definition of toe spring, i.e. how high the toe is at the front when the heel is raised to the correct height). Now, as for the entire forepart of two lasts being identical, I don't think they will be, although I think they will be similar. If you have 2...
I raise the two lasts, with toes facing each other, to the proper heel height. Do the toes' heights line up or not?.A couple of comments here. First, last makers who have measured thousand of feet and who have subsequently fitted shoes made on lasts for those feet perhaps know what they need to do for the last bottoms, without having an imprint. If one were to take a look at the notes they take, they often make notations as to special characteristics needed on the last...
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