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Posts by shoefan

Certainly not a leather tanner, but ....Tanning is not simply the coating/immersion of the rawhide in a solution of bacteria-killing ingredients. The tanning process changes the chemical structure of the leather, such that the collagen fibers present in the hide cross-link (perhaps in combination with the tanning agent). Also, one can eat acorns, which are often used for veg-tanning, so the edibility of a tanning agent is no proof that it cannot tan leather.Still, I'm...
Certainly looks like Kiton to me -- the Harry Rosen label, the Kiton lining, the tag in the pocket all look like what Kiton use. Let's put it this way -- would somebody fake all of that to make $200?
You might try RBJ (or RJ)?)Simpson (http://www.simpson-london.com/news/). They were founded after Tanner Krolle was bought by Chanel. Simpson was founded by a family member from the Tanner Krolle folks. Likely has some of the old T K craftspeople. From reading Permanent Style, it seems that perhaps they are now making the Tanner Krolle leather goods? (T K was sold by Chanel to a PE firm. Not at all clear that T K has any production facilities themselves.) If they...
I've done both methods -- last to measure and last 1/4" under at the top of the facings. I am inclined now to do the latter, but then you need to remember you've done it that way! Moreover, if you do a derby, you need to add a build up to the last if you want to close the facings parallel and have them parallel when worn.Bestetti does seem to close with the lining bridging the cone; it is impressive. Not sure I could even begin to imagine doing it that way.
I hear you and I respect what you are saying. I imagine, for people who really care about what they are doing, they would like to learn and even master more skills. Both of the 'makers' I spent time with in the UK were practicing 'closing' in their spare time. Likewise, I imagine they have tried other stitches (Goiser, Norvegese, pump) even if they've never been asked to do so. However, that does not necessarily mean they have plans to try 'closing' for paying...
Like in any pursuit, there are some who care passionately, and others not so much....If one believes that the solo craftsman is a superior model due to 'connecting,' then where does one draw the line. Should the shoemaker also make the lasts? What about tanning the leather? Spinning a hemp or linen thread from the fibers? Raising the cattle? Growing the flax or hemp? Is it the case that the more one does, the more connected one is to the final product? And, does...
Yes, therein lies a choice. It is my opinion that having people who specialize leads to better results most of the time; I've spent time with various specialists (last makers, closers, 'makers') and the speed and skill they demonstrate are indeed impressive. I've spent 10+ years (albeit not full time) trying to learn the breadth of shoemaking skills, and I am nowhere near as good as any of the folks. There is real value in repetitive effort. That being said, there are...
If you compare the "P' stitch, which is most analogous to a square awl aligned perpendicular to the welt, to the "VR" stitch, which is most like an angled square awl, you can see the latter stitches lay in a straighter line, so perhaps there is something to it. Also, remember that we are dealing with a shoemaker's stitch, not a lockstitch, and the threads may be a lot tighter fit, so I'm not 100% sure the lay of the machine stitch is the best indication. Interesting to...
I don't think so. If so, wouldn't you do it symmetrically? The consistency of the angle looks like a fudge wheel to me.No, not sure. I'll see if I can figure it out. I think it has to do with making it easier for the stitches to run in a straight line. On the other hand, it might slightly weaken the seam, since you are rotating the holes and thereby slightly lessening the distance between them. Imagine rotating the awl 90 degrees, then you'd be really weakening (or...
I am guessing he has a fudge wheel with angled teeth. I think it would be hard (impossible?) to use a typical fudge wheel to get this angle, as the wheel would need to keep running off the edge in order to achieve the angled grooves. Notice how the angles go from right to left on the left side of each of the Crup shoes? One one shoe (the left), the left side is the outside of the shoe, on the other (right) shoe the left side is the inside. One fudges the same direction...
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