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Posts by shoefan

Of course, there are multiple places stitching is used in a shoe, so the answer will perhaps vary. Furthermore, some stitching is functional, some is purely decorative. So, that will affect the answer as well.And yes, leather varies, both in thickness and in strength, so the 'optimal' stitching would vary depending on that.There are also different needle sizes (with corresponding thread weights) and shapes, which will affect how many stitches can be crowded into a given...
Those are John Lobb (London) bespoke shoes. They stamp the outsoles and, I believe, heel top lifts before the materials are sent to the 'maker,' who constructs the shoes. Thus, the stamped "LOBB" ends up at different places on the outsole, depending on how the maker cuts the leather. You could perhaps date the shoes based on the stamps on the heel pad, since those show the Royal Warrants held by Lobb at the time. Also, I think perhaps the cities listed on the heel pad...
So where have Teemu and Dominic gone?
The business model in the UK is that the suit pattern is created by the 'cutter,' who then cuts the fabric. This fabric with the associated bits (chest padding, etc) is supplied to one or more 'tailors' who sew the garment. The cutter likely does the fittings, marking the suit and then sending it back to the tailors. After the final fitting, things like the button holes may be done by yet another person who specializes in these tasks.Iirc, a one-man operation who can do...
The puckering comes from the lasting of the toe -- when you go around the toe, there is excess leather that needs to be 'chased' away from the edge and into the interior of the insole. That can be a fair amount of work and, with a thicker leather, a bit of a challenge, but (obviously) makers know how to do this, as most shoes/boots, including those made from heavier leathers, don't demonstrate this flaw.More troubling are the visible inseam stitches. This would appear to...
Certainly not a leather tanner, but ....Tanning is not simply the coating/immersion of the rawhide in a solution of bacteria-killing ingredients. The tanning process changes the chemical structure of the leather, such that the collagen fibers present in the hide cross-link (perhaps in combination with the tanning agent). Also, one can eat acorns, which are often used for veg-tanning, so the edibility of a tanning agent is no proof that it cannot tan leather.Still, I'm...
Certainly looks like Kiton to me -- the Harry Rosen label, the Kiton lining, the tag in the pocket all look like what Kiton use. Let's put it this way -- would somebody fake all of that to make $200?
You might try RBJ (or RJ)?)Simpson (http://www.simpson-london.com/news/). They were founded after Tanner Krolle was bought by Chanel. Simpson was founded by a family member from the Tanner Krolle folks. Likely has some of the old T K craftspeople. From reading Permanent Style, it seems that perhaps they are now making the Tanner Krolle leather goods? (T K was sold by Chanel to a PE firm. Not at all clear that T K has any production facilities themselves.) If they...
I've done both methods -- last to measure and last 1/4" under at the top of the facings. I am inclined now to do the latter, but then you need to remember you've done it that way! Moreover, if you do a derby, you need to add a build up to the last if you want to close the facings parallel and have them parallel when worn.Bestetti does seem to close with the lining bridging the cone; it is impressive. Not sure I could even begin to imagine doing it that way.
I hear you and I respect what you are saying. I imagine, for people who really care about what they are doing, they would like to learn and even master more skills. Both of the 'makers' I spent time with in the UK were practicing 'closing' in their spare time. Likewise, I imagine they have tried other stitches (Goiser, Norvegese, pump) even if they've never been asked to do so. However, that does not necessarily mean they have plans to try 'closing' for paying...
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