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Posts by shoefan

Projects underway:
It really depends on what/where the differences are. First of all, one 'whole size' is only 1/3 inch in length, so that is not really that big a difference relative to the overall foot length -- let's say 10.5 inches, so you are talking a 3% - 4% difference. You also mostly only see the front/vamp of the shoe. So, for example, for feet mostly differing in length, the difference can be built into the rear part of the pattern, so the vamps look basically the same. If one...
I believe Frank Jones is of the opinion that a linen (or cotton?) twill lining is superior to a leather lining for the vamp section of the lining. I have an old pair of Stetson full brogues that have a twill vamp lining.
Not that it is any of my business, but I would encourage you to reconsider your interest in the Modernya. I made a pair a few years back in this leather, and I think the finish on the leather looks very plasticky and not that appealing -- I think you might well regret the purchase. Something like the Crack's St Crispin's baby calf in their burnishable blue, their Russian hatch grain in blue, or their Weinheimer London Calf (a grained leather) would be a much better...
There is no cork filler on those test shoes. That is just the flesh side of the insole; it can be quite loose and flanky, particularly if a looser section is used for trial shoes, as is likely.
Well, a pump stitch is used for light duty shoes that are to be worn around the house and, perhaps, to the occasional formal occasion (depending on the style). They are not designed for heavy use in walking outdoors, etc., so wear should be minimal. Perhaps the heaviest wear would come from dancing! If the shoe is properly made, then the stitches are protected by the outsole and insole (it is at the interface where the two meet), so absent heavy wear or abuse there...
This is not quite correct. The traditional (English) pump stitch doesn't have a welt, that is true. However, as opposed to a Blake stitch, which goes vertically through the insole and into the interior of the shoe, the pump stitch goes through holes made parallel to the surface of the insole. Definitely not a stitch many 'makers' still are good at doing. I believe Bengal bought a second-hand pair of Lobb St James pumps, and the soles were just glued on, no pump stitch...
I don't have a horse in this race, however........ if one is making a science-based argument, I don't know that I would be in any hurry to be citing the words of a Chiropractor as support, as that profession is not particularly noted for its adherence to scientifically validated statements. Furthermore, on what basis or theory does he make his assertion?Also, when standing, the bulk of one's weight is borne by the heel, the ball joints, and the arches (both longitudinal...
I was just reviewing that post myself! To any/all interested, the linked post is very interesting. (Perhaps this conversation belongs in the shoemaking thread, as opposed to this Japanese shoes thread.)
Two comments regarding the 'tunnel stitch.' First, the apron seam as shown is what, I believe, the old-timers would call the split and lift. The toe seam (and DW's illustration) show what I believe is called a round stitch, or a round-closed seam. In the apron stitch shown, only one side of the stitch features the 'tunnel' element -- the other side of the stitch penetrates the full thickness of the leather (on the vamp/sole-side piece of leather). I also believe that,...
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