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Posts by hardline_42

If you proof the uppers properly, the standard Katahdins will do just fine. I suggest welt-seal and sno-seal but others will chime in with their goop of choice. The only strike against the cork sole is that it has pretty poor traction. By the way, both soles are rubber. The cork sole (Vibram #475) is Nitrile with cork fibers while the Montagna lug-sole (VIbram #132) is an all-rubber compound. Both will be useless on ice, but the lug-sole on the waterproof version...
Thanks. I have the GQ boots that are also half-gusseted and didn't want to give up that feature. It's a shame none of the service boots have any lace hooks, but they still look great.
Do any of these new styles have gusseted tongues? It's hard to tell from the pics.
If you're not married to the idea of a cap toe, Chippewa has a line of boots that are similar in style but way better suited to a construction site. Examples:The 20066. Same as the GQ boots with a steel toeThe 25265. 8" version with dual density soleThe 20086. 8" version with Vibram lug soleAll models come in 6" and 8" and some in dark brown and tan. As for durability, they're quite robust if you treat them right. If you plan to wear them (or any other leather shoe)...
If you want them broken in within a day, soak them in warm water for about ten minutes, put on two pairs of socks (sock liner and wool hiking sock work for me) and wear them laced all the way up and tight until they're dry. The two pairs of socks will prevent blisters and the soaking will replicate a months worth of wearing, sweating and drying.
There's more to it than cap toe vs plain toe. The Apache Lacer (GQ) has a full 360* leather welt. The Katahdin boot has a plastic and leather 270* welt. The GQ has a Vibram Stockbridge Gumlite sole, which is lighter and grippier than the cork sole, IMO. The differences aren't going to make or break you if it's just a casual wear boot, but the GQ is better built as a work or outdoor boot. The same boot comes in a steel toe, 8" height and three different lugged soles...
The shoes you've linked aren't really what comes to mind when you think of "boat shoes." Those are canvas sneakers with a moc toe and 360* lacing. If you want to stay in the sub $100 range for a pair of real boat shoes (leather, hand-stitched toe and heel, razor-siped boat sole) I would suggest the Timberland version over both Sperry AO's and Sebago Docksides. I've had three pairs and I think they're the best in their category. Padded tongue, razor-siped, welted sole,...
This is the only pic I have at the moment, and it's not a very good one at that. I can take more this weekend.*edit: Took a few pics
First off, I'm a fan of the Bean Blucher. I think it's a good looking shoe, even though the current version doesn't really match the original in both style and construction. Having never owned one of the original Made-in-Maine bluchers, I was swayed by the good looks of LLB Signature's Eastport Handsewn Blucher Moc. I bought this shoe over a year ago and wore it pretty hard since then. It's probably my most versatile casual shoe. So, naturally, I was pretty bummed when it...
Quote: Originally Posted by sinnedk i like sperry n quoddy but i dont feel like boat shoes should be over $100... they are too casual to be in shell Agreed. My favorite boat shoes are Timberland Authentic 2-eyes from my local outlet. Cheap and way better construction than even the venerable Sperry A/O with a classic toe shape, real laser-cut siping (not molded), a welted sole and a padded tongue. I think a boat shoe in shell would kind of...
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