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Posts by fxh

I'm afraid to buy stuff based on my birth year
My understanding is that its not the actual dry cleaning that should be avoided with ties its the ironing them flat afterwards that ruins them. A friend has good success with silk - soaking it briefly in soapy (wool wash) tepid water, swishing whole tie gently in bath then rinsing out by gently swishing in clean tepid water then drying on towel flat like you do a wool jumper. I haven't tried it on a decent thick tie - I'll make a note to try it soon ish.
I'm guessing its a shirt? Alcohol is ok but either use "rubbing alcohol" or vodka - cheap generic vodka is what the theatre dressing people usually use - to clean clothes. If you are going to mix it with coke, OJ or whatever, why get anything other than the cheapest You may have already set it too much by your efforts. You can try nail polish remover = acetone available in 1 litre containers for 2% of the cost at Bunnings - also good for stripping shoe colour back. And...
Oh dear
what is the item of clothing? What is the material? Is it ink or biro? Where is it? ( Don't tell me Canberra - I mean on the garment)
I'd be surprised if Buckley lived in a cafe in Sorrento
Matt, just to be clear I think the Louise Edmunds stuff is a joke. Slightly rewritten PR/shilling/ advertising copy dosed with feel good positive inanities. It's about as informed as getting menswear advice from a rural hens night planner. There's plenty to discuss about clothes and meaning. Just not in the pages of Executive Style.
THE AGE Experience within retail trend analysis companies has earned Louise Edmonds cred in the luxury menswear sector. The founder of MenStylePower.com utilises her passion and understanding of fashion to deliver a fresh, edgy take on men's style. Read more: http://www.executivestyle.com.au/weekend-style-guide-what-to-wear-when-youre-off-duty-gri1z1#ixzz4KaNFsnnq If anyone has shared my men's style journey, MenStylePower turned 7 in August. I have officially called...
Charles Tyrwhitt pays $10,800 ACCC fine for misleading pricing on shirts Lucy Cormack THE AGE When a store compares a "was" price to a "now" price, it can be the difference between a shopper purchasing something and not. The only problem is, what if the product was never actually purchased for the original price? The practice is known as two-price comparison advertising, and this week it left a London-based clothing manufacturer and retailer paying a penalty of more...
it's duck shooting season already?
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