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Posts by ringring

The talc might work. Applying it from the underside of the denim. Otherwise, you could try dry cleaning fluid - perchloroethylene aka 'perc', which is a common solvent in spray-on stain removers. Lay the splashed part of the jeans face down on some paper towels. Spray or dab the solvent on the back of the stain. Wait till it drys. It typically becomes a white power - which you then brush off. Then repeat if necessary.
I'm very much still on the learning curve still. Hank dyeing refers to dyeing by hand where the yarns are gathered into bundles (hanks) and dipped into the indigo. The bundles are twisted during this process (imagine ringing out a cloth - except the bundles are submerged in the dye vat), thus adding some physical force into the dyeing process. This, added to the multiple dips, and prolonged oxidation process, can result in very deep penetration of the indigo...
Quote: Originally Posted by xchen The Stronghold in LA. Agreed.
Quote: Originally Posted by onion Look for jeans which are hank/dip dyed instead of rope dyed. In general, hank dying produces a deeper, more saturated indigo color and less vertical streaks. I'm not sure that is necessary the case. For example the hank dyed jeans from Eternal, Pure Blue and Sugarcane are amongst the most streaky jeans on the planet. The Sugarcane Hawaii's being most obviously streaky. Also there are many rope dyed and...
You will learn a lot about denim by experimenting the effects of abrasion and washing on indigo loss. It will give you a better eye for appreciating both industrial wash techniques and real worn jeans. You will not be able to achieve light coloured washes quickly unless you use chemicals (and stone washing). However, you do have an advantage over commercial laundries - time, and perhaps more love. If you take your time, you can achieve a look that would be...
Quote: Originally Posted by ken I'm way ahead of you. But they'll have to be straight stitched, because I don't have a chain stitch machine. They say they use a French fell seam, but the picture they show looks like a flat-fell seam. I know the construction of the two are different... not sure about the strength. The seam they have pictured is a fell seam, they call it French Fell (as opposed to a french seam, commonly used as a clean...
Quote: Originally Posted by ken Also, for what it's worth, I have had a pair of jeans with a lapped yolk. They were a pair of Agave, and, honestly, I've only owned a couple pairs of jeans since that I felt were constructed better (RRL being one). I'm not trying to start an argument. You know a helluva lot about jeans (and it's good to see you posting again). I just don't really like why very much. Lapped seams and open seams are regularly used...
I really don't think this is true. I hear all the time about how felled seams are the strongest type of seam, with the reasoning mostly being, "well, just look at all that fabric tied up in there!" But I've never seen any empirical evidence that they're stronger than a lapped seam, and the argument does exist among top textile manufacturers. What I do know is this: most of the jeans espoused to be of highest quality around here have lapped inseams. None of my high...
Quote: Originally Posted by ken I was going to say this but wasn't 100% positive, so I held off... until now: flat felled seams are a sign of crappy jeans. They're everywhere because manufacturers have automagic folders that automate the process. They're not as stong as the serged busted seam that's stitched on top of itself (can't remember what it's called) that's standard on quality jeans. Flat felled seams are avoided on highly loaded items. Some...
I would shy away from the word authentic, but the history of a garment is very much of interest. I think your term, 'culturally anchored' is fascinating and reflects the need to create a story to justify our purchasing decisions. The image that workwear built our roads, ploughed our fields, constructed our tenements, creates a kind of romance and grandeur through daily struggle. Like a Springsteen narrative or the beautifully broken sound of a minor chord. Does the...
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