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Posts by Peacoat

EDIT NOTE: Content of post deleted because it was a duplicate of the one above, and I answered my own question. Couldn't find a way to do a complete and clean delete of the entire message, so I did it this way.
Roots: It has been my rather extensive experience in fitting peacoats that the stated size is only a starting point. In order to get a good fit, the p2p measurement must be obtained from the seller. And don't let them tell you the "chest size" of the coat. Too much error can creep in that way. You need for them to actually measure the pit to pit. Ask them to stretch the fabric tight, let it relax and then take the measurement across the chest, just under the...
Joe, thanks for taking the time to measure. Had you let the coat relax before taking the measurement, it would probably have been right at 20.25. This is consistent with the p2p on a vintage peacoat, so the fit of the chest size is the same as the older models. It appears that "Authentic" is an appropriate name with respect to fit--at least in the chest. Sewing the button back on is fairly simple. Just make sure you don't sew through a pocket. Go to a fabric store...
I have found that shipping does tend to be stressful on a new peacoat, and a few days of relaxing is a good idea.If you would also post your chest measurement, wearing just a tight Tshirt, or no shirt, that would give prospective buyers an objective frame of reference for the way the 38 fits you and the way a size 38 might fit them. For instance, we know that a size 36 is a bit snug on you and a 38 might be just a little loose, but we don't yet know your measured chest...
On the 38 I'd like to know the pit to pit, across the chest, with the fabric first pulled tight and then allowed to relax just before the measurement is taken.
That is a current issue peacoat.
The additional comments below may be helpful in your search for the proper size peacoat:First, read the section on sizing in my article, if you haven't already done so. That will make sizing and fit of peacoats easier to understand.Second, understand that the language we use for proper measurement and fit is P2P in inches. We don't speak in terms of a 43" inch Chest, or a size 42 peacoat; that only confuses things.Third, take your chest measurement wearing only a tightly...
Just saw this page of the thread, or I would have answered your question in my previous post.From the beginning up until 1979, inclusive, the official color was a dark "midnight blue" in the Kersey wool that looked almost black. In 1980 the material changed to a Melton wool, and the color changed to a true black.I have found the civilian peacoats to be fitted larger than the issue coats, so if you go to a 42 in a 740N, it may well be too large for your tastes. I like...
If you were getting an issue peacoat, your size would be a 40. That size should leave enough room for a sweater when the temps get below freezing. Not knowing anything about the Schott, I'm not sure how the Schott size 40 would fit.Your best bet is to find the Schott message board, which I believe is at the Schott online site . It is manned by Gail. She is knowledgeable about these things, and could probably give you a pretty good idea of what you will need. I also...
The tag indicates a current issue peacoat.
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