or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by quill

Thanks, aybojs. I certainly understood the intent of what alchimiste stated, and it's clear you understood it as well. I simply mean that even in an environment where you may not need to use a superior knowledge of apparel, having it doesn't hurt, and can always help you help others better...or advance yourself, of course. To resign oneself to "not bothering" because the company doesn't bother to offer quality just adds even more to its already heavy burden of poor...
Quote: Quote: (aybojs @ June 17 2005,09:02) I agree that there needs to be more knowledge taught to the sales staff Why would you need to be knowledgeable about good clothes if it's not what you have for sale? Not to be disrespectful, alchimiste, but that's a cheap shot. aybojs was willing to speak up, in what could certainly be considered a potentially "hostile" environment here, and offer his honest opinion, while not...
I don't know what the picture refers to, but I'm now guessing (based on the number 17.5) that M stands for "microns," the measure of fineness of fiber. Micron numbers tend to run...what?...from 22 microns down to 12 or so, depending on the fiber. Some merino wools can be 18, 17, 16 microns, some cashmeres and vicuñas even less. So that's why I'd guess that M stands for micron. 'Course, once again, I could be totally off my rocker.
Just earlier terms for warp and weft. Ends are the same as warp: the threads run vertical, top to bottom. Picks are the "fill" threads, same as weft: they run horizontal, side to side. I don't know what M stands for. But our modern term for "end on end" fabric is actually a bastardization of "end and end," which meant threads of alternating colors, side by side, that run top to bottom. As always, I could be wrong, but I think that's a close definition.
Sorry, FFW, I don't have any advice for you, but I find it strange that you didn't get any replies - because I've always heard (and I could be wrong) that men look at buckles when buying a belt. Is this true? Do any of you who are belt shopping bypass a belt, assuming you like the leather, if the buckle isn't what you'd prefer? In the meantime, FFW, you could try taking a look at this older thread: http://66.170.193.77/cgi-bin....;t=6638
Quote: Quote: (quill @ May 02 2005,21:31) Typically, a wrinkle is formed when hydrogen bonds between chains in the fabric structure are broken and then reformed in the new position. In wrinkle-resistant treatments, strong covalent bonds replace weaker hydrogen bonds, giving the molecules more stability in their positions. Is wool vulcanized?. Well, I'm certainly not a chemist, but in the sense of using heat and pressure (as in...
I don't know much about "treatments" for wool that make it wrinkle resistant, but I know that wool can be naturally wrinkle resistant. Typically, a wrinkle is formed when hydrogen bonds between chains in the fabric structure are broken and then reformed in the new position. In wrinkle-resistant treatments, strong covalent bonds replace weaker hydrogen bonds, giving the molecules more stability in their positions. So molecules are pulled back into alignement, preventing...
Quote: What is the difference between a fusible and a non-fusible interfacing? A fusible interfacing/interlining is applied using heat. A interfacing/interlining without the special heat fusing adhesive is referred to as "sew-in" or non-fusible interfacing. Sew-in interfacing is not as popular as fusible interfacing because it requires more time to apply to the garment. It does not provide the same quality level as a fusible product. Funny. I...
It's the ol' "plants vs. pants" hypocrisy.
Yes, but you have to put the setting on "high."
New Posts  All Forums: