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Posts by Sam Hober

Beautiful ties - good work gentlemen - I am very impressed. I have always thought that if you made model airplanes, boats etc as a boy then you can make clothes as you will have a feeling for small details. You can certainly use scissors and many tie makers use them, but we prefer rotary blades as they work very smoothly after you are used to them. Saltricks As Cary Grant mentions a nice cutting board is a good idea to use. We cut wool with a rotary blade with no...
Bobbers, The silk in your photos are not grenadines.
If you are very careful and avoid the edges you can gently iron a tie at the correct heat setting. Typically high end ties will have pure wool interlinings which will take care of most of your problems with wrinkling. Rolling ties is a debatable subject as it does have the possibility of damaging tie tips - to be safe don't do it with a luxury tie.
James, The project is moving slowly as we are busy nonstop with making ties and pocket squares. I may decide to buy rather than grow some madder root at first to speed things up. The overall idea is to go back to natural dyes as they have a beautiful look. Last week I spoke with a friend who is working on a cotton with natural dye bicycle bag and there is a small but enthusiastic demand for natural dyes. At the moment i am working on a photo gallery for our ties but...
Costanza, Your question is interesting. First, most tie constructions will work with most knots with some exceptions. As an example a grenadine weave is a loose one which will naturally create a full knot so we don't suggest Windsor knots with grenadines. A lighter tie in general will balance with a Windsor knot. If you want a smaller or larger knot you would adjust the width of the tie in the knot area. Adjusting the interlining is also a possibility but not the best...
Jeromestyle,I have a photo of a formal ascot that we made (without pleats) and in August I hope to have a photo of an informal ascot (with pleats). We also make ascot squares (neckerchiefs) which look just like a pocket square but bigger. You can send me your email address and I will be happy to email a photo.For formal ascots we often use formal/wedding silks woven in England. For informal ascots printed silks are nice, and for ascot squares we use Tahi silk or...
Jeromestyle,Good questions - one important thng to consider is your collar size. When we make ascots (only custom made ones) we like to take into consideration neck size and collar width.
Threadbearer,Well said.Madder ties are typically thought of as having traditional paisley designs but can have other designs.The Madder finish that was used for many years in England has not been used in a long time - perhaps 10 years? Due to environmental laws.Natural dyes are not typically used in madder silks although salesmen may tell you something else.Natural madder dye can have various shades depending how the root is treated.
Pantiscocrat,A good question - from our pocket square care instructions:Pocket squares can be ironed on the inside flat area. Be careful not to iron the hand rolled edges. To be safe use a press cloth to prevent a glossy shine from developing. Patterned fabric should be ironed on the reverse side.For deep wrinkles a gentle steam from a steam iron or steamer can be used on the reverse side before ironing. Also, be very careful when steaming pocket squares as occasionally...
Daniel, You should not have a snag on a new tie. I am completely certain that you will not have one with the tie that you ordered from us as each tie that we sell is custom made by us with multiple levels of quality control. This is one of the differences between our custom made ties and most others.which typically are not custom made. With that said Kent is a good man who cares about his customers - send him an email.
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