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Posts by pejsek

Well, to get back to the allure part, isn't it obvious? These are some of the most beautiful clothes you could ever hope to acquire. And while it may strike some as an unsavory bit of bottom feeding, there are even distinct advantages found in this avenue to bespoke. One of the greatest is that those who tend to discard bespoke clothing after a few years are often among a tailor's best and most experienced customers--they know what they want and have been willing to pay...
I've been a passionate and dedicated consumer of SR clothes and bespoke shoes on the secondary market for many years now. Alright, yes, I buy them at thrift stores. I'm about a 42R and wear a size 9.5/10 shoe, which probably puts me in the largest class of consumers (especially once we adjust for the age and proclivities of most bespoke suit and shoe customers). I've never had much trouble finding clothes that fit me and I can't say that I detect much sizing difference...
Wow. That's beautiful. Thanks for demonstrating the proper storage of suits.
I used to be guilty of this, but I've since cleaned up my act. I was younger and it was fun, but not really defensible. It's probably not quite so much fun now that it's a mass-market ploy (but, hey, they probably need the working buttons on those jackets to keep the sleeves from covering the whole hand). The discussion, however, leads me to a corrolary question about button etiquette. It seems to me that the purist approach to a four-button sleeve is to have the lower...
Well, frayed collars and cuffs have their well-recognized charms. I have an old striped T&A shirt in a particularly nice state of decay that still never fails to draw complements. Of course some shirts fray because of dry-cleaning (.?) or the usual heavy hand with the starch. Those are not nearly so appealing.
I must say I don't quite get the squeamishness about pumps. These are clearly the shoes to wear with a dinner jacket. Oh, I know everyone makes a patent leather laceup, but I really think that's just an accomodation and the way to really stand apart from the rented tuxes is to don the pump with bows in patent or black calf. Funny, though, every time I see a pair of these in a thrift store they are in the womens section. But those guys aren't the arbiters of taste, are...
You know, as unlikely as it may seem, I really think it's quite possible all of your finds of the past couple of days might be traced back to a single source. How many people in Seattle were buying McAfee shoes and Chester Barrie tailored clothing 25-30 years ago? I've seen it happen here in San Francisco. Once I bought a Kiton suit jacket and found the matching pants a couple of weeks later at a completely unrelated thrift store. Anyway, another great find. Don't even...
My guess, J, is that this suit comes from the same owner as those wonderful shoes. I don't think there's any way to tell where it was purchased and it may very well have been bought in England; many American specialty stores preferred to put in a house label along the lines of, for example, "Made In England for Cable Car Clothiers by..." and this suit lacks such a label. My hunch is that this suit goes back to sometime in the 1970s and is from the line that Flusser...
In my experience Huntsman is the only Savile Row tailor to have flirted with a label on the outside of the inside pocket. I have seen a number of Huntsman suits and jackets from the 1960s and 1970s with their distinctive logo on this kind of label. This always struck me as a bit strange, since--as Manton points out--it is so against SR tradition. But then Huntsman may be Huntsman most of all. Since then, however, they seem to have reverted to the standard label-less approach.
I hope I do no harm by adding a small excerpt from Alan Flusser's 1981 book, Making The Man: Gieves & Hawkes was formerly one of the most prestigious custom tailors on Savile Row. It still makes military uniforms for the Royal family, but today its real area of specialty is the ready-made suit. If you want a ready-made English-cut suit, the Gieves & Hawkes' models from Chester Barrie are the finest in London. They have been called the Rolls Royce of ready-made suits. Each...
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