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Posts by jerrybrowne

Those pointy shoes are ridiculous. So......I'm amazed to be saying this, but I think the shoes with the metal studs on them are the most versatile of the bunch.
Beautiful!
Sorry. Bad joke....
Looks like slipped gemming. Calling DW....
If you cut a piece from the toe box from a new pair from each maker, I could probably identify the maker with 70% accuracy.
Well worth it!
Different makers finish their shell in different ways. For example Alden adds an acrylic finish to their #8, making it deeper in color, shiny, and in my opinion, more plastic like. On the other end of the spectrum is Vass which, I believe, doesn't even buff the shoes before shipping.It's also not just about the cordovan itself. EG is, in general, just more careful when making their shoes, and more detail oriented. Think about your friend who is super OCD about things-...
I have lots of EG crup and have never received a pair with mismatched shades or blemishes, unlike my Aldens, Vass, and Crockett and Jones which often suffer from both. Never had mismatched or blemished crup from St. crispins or bespoke either.Horween sells their shell by grades, although I think the grading has more to do with size. Perhaps EG buys higher grades and cuts around imperfections? Probably are more careful which butts they pair together for shoes too so less...
Pretty standard. I primarily use Poole, but also use Steed.
In my experience cutters do consider themselves tailors. Most cutters work their way up through the ranks to be cutters and no longer "make". However they play a critical role that is similar to a designer and fitter, which is still part of tailoring.One thing that distinguishes cutters from coatmakers etc is that they require "front of the house" skills b/c they deal directly with the customer, take their measurements, figure out how to fix fit issues, and sell. Not...
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