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Posts by robinsongreen68

yeah they need to train these bouncer types a bit better though, i remember one eyeing me up and down at least three times before buzzing me in. i guess he was registering a shaven-headed mixed race guy in jeans, t shirt and leather jacket, but it was a distinct turn off to me; for a moment i had a ridiculous urge to pull up my sleeve and show him this [[SPOILER]]
interesting to hear this. in london, paris and berlin they've invested in prestigious locations and the boutiques are almost intimidating, with bouncers to buzz you in etc. swatch group management is very focused on the asian spend (much of which takes place in European capitals), it's likely that smaller cities in the US are just not a priority
please don't buy that jacket. look at something plain from suitsupply, uniqlo or even H&M
I've carried that sentence in my mind for years without considering the bestiality aspect, but now that you've pointed it out, I don't entirely discount it.. is there an echo of Yeats's leda and the swan (published the preceding year i think) there, both in terms of the image and the percussive force of the language? 'the great wings beating still/Above the staggering girl'also isn't there a bit of yeatsian cadence/imagery in the mccarthy quote? kinda like 'were you but...
That ability to lift the hair on your arms through his particular refinement of ancient rhythms. Peel the sentences of meaning (or at least create silly new ones), and you might see this clearer. Yeah thats really good, agree with what you're saying here. A sentence that comes to mind (from 'As I Lay Dying'): "When Jewel can almost touch him, the horse stands on his hind legs and slashes down at Jewel. Then Jewel is enclosed by a glittering maze of hooves as by an...
huh. i agree it's pretty pointless bickering about who's the best (straight away i think of the old guys in the barber shop in 'coming to america'). but just taking that quote at face value and out of context, to me it has a hollow ring in the sense that it reaches for easy images of the eternal/sublime; there's a certain (ersatz?) melvillian poetry to it but melville's extraordinary rhetorical flights are balanced by reams of careful exposition. even then I don't think...
damn, dude. so who does write really good english prose then?
if you mean pale fire, no not at all, you quickly get used to the format and then its really funny and towards the end has an almost filmic momentum.Thanks for the reply noob, I notice there's a lot of pre-publicity for his new collection here, plus some parts of it have featured in the new yorker- they actually read as bizarrely conventional compared to the one thing i've read of his (notable american women). I didn't know he had links with mcsweeney's, i've never read...
I read the gift years ago, it's wonderful but i felt there was a lot i was missing. I think each of the main parts contains motifs from a great Russian writer- Lermontov, Chekhov etc- so in many ways it's his love letter/farewell to Russian literature. Having only read those writers in translation, a lot of that went over my head. Also, even though he translated it himself, I don't think the prose is quite up to the level of the books he wrote in english. Pnin is just...
could someone pls size me for that dana lee, im 5'11"/ 170. looking at an M but the back length says 28*, which seems pretty short, i thought it was supposed to fit slouchy
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