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Posts by Lensmaster

I remember seeing pictures from the early 60's of white shirts with very small ruffles, two rows spaced out on either side. Not something I would wear but with an otherwise traditional tux it might be interesting, as long as you weren't wearing it to a very traditional event. And you have to be ready to be noticed.
I looked at the pictures for the Sinatra Soiree. This is a Sinatra themed party and the event listing states Vintage Dress. While few men tried to dress in anything resembling black tie, which is what Sinatra would have worn to an evening party, what is sad is that most men aren't even wearing a tie. I guess they figured putting on a sport coat was sacrifice enough. I thought D.C. was a bit more formal that other parts of the country.
There has been an evolution in formal attire from colorful court dress, to white tie, to black tie, and now apparently to the business suit. There is a line of thought that not only is this inevitable but that the older styles of formal dress should become obsolete as the next informal style becomes considered formal. I don't subscribe to that philosophy. I think business suits should be worn at work more during the day, casual every days don't work for me. I think men...
That is the thought that many American's have that change for the sake of change is good. There are good changes and bad changes. Change itself is not inherently good. Why would I not want to dress ans my grandfather or great-grandfather? That sounds like an insult. I wear what I do because it looks good and always will. Not everything people wore in the past was good. I pick and choose. I will never wear a zoot suit just because it was worn in the 1940's. I will not wear...
I don't believe I ever said that wasn't so.
I didn't say a uniform, which is what white tie basically is. I said "tradition" and "same kind of thing." As you said black tie gives men a degree of latitude, not free reign. When I wear black tie I know I am dressed the same way men were 30, 60, or 80 years ago. I have some variety. I wear peak and shawl lapels, I sometimes were pleated shirts and sometimes marcella shirts, I wear a cummerbund and when I get it will sometimes wear a waistcoat. There are choices but all...
I don't remember anyone on this thread who is a supporter of peak/shawl lapels saying you should never wear a notch lapel tuxedo and if you do you are a bad person. Rather some have strongly stated that notch lapels historically have been in the minority and they will never wear one. I am also one who will never wear a notch lapel DJ. I have both a peak and a shawl. To me they both have a more special look to them. My suits have notch lapels and I want to look more dressy...
In the small city in Michigan where I live I attend the local orchestra concerts in Black Tie. Hardly anyone else is dressed anywhere near in formality to me but it feels like a proper event to me and I get compliments. Sometimes you just have to choose events to dress for.
I find it interesting when people say that black tie has changed significantly over the last century and so current changes are just part of that evolution. The only changes I can think of that became part of the standard black tie kit is the turn down collar shirt and the cummerbund came around fairly early in the 20th century. The white dinner jacket is a warm weather option but not considered part of a basic kit. So unless I'm missing something the tuxedo hasn't...
It gets a little tiresome to hear people who claim to want to wear a tuxedo to look good say that parts of it that they don't like are archaic. A few pages ago the cummerbund was called archaic. Some people have called the bow tie archaic. Why then even wear a tuxedo. It can all be considered archaic. Why the satin lapels and satin stripe down the pants leg? Why a white shirt? I think of the whole outfit as classic, traditional. People wear the tuxedo, you are attracted to...
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