or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by tj100

That's the key right there. A high GPA is a good proxy for what it takes to be an investment banking analyst. It's all about putting in the hard work and kissing your professor's (I mean, VP's) ass. How smart you are is not really important, because fundamentally, the job is not difficult.Now, if you have a lousy GPA, there are some strategies to help. If, as the earlier posted noted, you had a really poor freshman year, you could list your "GPA in major" which would...
I'd be willing to wager that relatively few people who put in the 100 hour work weeks find themselves having lost all of their savings and future prospects. Seems like more of an issue for the guys who spent their 20s smelling the roses. I know a lot of guys who lost their jobs when Lehman went bust; all of them are doing just fine.
The argument of NORE is that you could start creating "roses" now, and by waiting, they won't smell as sweet.Personally, I don't buy it, but to each his own.I think there are different paths to happiness. Mine has worked out so far for me, and his has worked out for him. Neither is the right one.
I don't fundamentally disagree with this. The difference though, is that I have the option. FWIW, this isn't a "give my kids what I never had", because I'll never be able to give my kids what my parents gave to me (and it seemed to work out all right for me). If private school is the right thing for my kids, I'm glad to have that option.You seem to think that having more money means that you won't be a very good parent. I tend to think that good parenting and financial...
I think the jury is out on that. We'd both agree that there is such a thing as being too young or too old to start a family. But my first kid was born when I was the same age that my father was when I was born, and he never struck me as "old" (I suppose he also never struck me as "cool", but that's a whole different metric).Life is full of trade-offs. I waited to have kids, and that will provide them with some opportunities that they wouldn't otherwise have (because we...
I always lived by my parents advice that "if you enjoy your career, you'll never work a day in your life." I look back on those days as a retired athlete (probably) looks back on theirs: that was fun, it was challenging, I'm really glad I did it, and I could never have kept it up into my mid 30s.You can always pick out the analysts and associates who are in it for the money. They are miserable all the time.
And that's before you get out on the road for client visits with three other 24 year olds and a partner escaping his numbing life and signing the expense approvals.
I have not one regret.My 20s were pretty awesome, especially the tail end when I had no obligations and more income than I had time to spend it. I really think that's the crux of it. It was hard, but it was fun. My fondest career memories are being in the office at 3:00am, working as a team to get something out for a breakfast meeting. I really enjoyed it. I couldn't do it now that I'm married with kids, but when I was 23? It was a lot of fun.Am I going to look back...
It's interesting, I busted my ass for 10 years (4 in banking, 6 in private equity) and there was always a group of people around (both family and friends) asking "why do you work so hard? / you have no work-life balance" or my personal favorite "on an hourly basis, I make more as a bartender than you do!"Now we're in our early/mid 30's, and these same people seem perplexed / amazed: "it's sooo hard to save up for a down payment on a house, you're sooo lucky that you could...
When I was younger, I established the absolute limit was 112 hours a week (16 hours a day, seven days) and you could only do it for two consecutive weeks, and then needed to take the third weekend mostly off to recover. That's how life used to be for IB analysts (I think it's changed a little bit). I won't pretend that we did this all the time, I probably did it six or eight weeks a year, and the normal workload was something in the 80 hour range.The big difference in...
New Posts  All Forums: