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Posts by glenjay

I was addressing waterproofing products applied to the surface of a shoe upper, but of course the molecular makeup (and mass in some cases) of a given product will define its resistance to water.
The GlenKaren water resistant polish includes sodium bentonite, which is a clay. This clay makes the polish in the jar feel a little gritty, and although the polish becomes smooth as it is rubbed into the shoe, some people don’t like the feel of the clay and are concerned about its effect on the leather.It should also be noted that the water resistant polish will not water proof the shoe, but simply slow down the absorption of water into the protein fibers. You could get...
I would like to ask some questions of the forum members in regard to using cream versus paste (wax) polish. I was going to start another thread so I could include a poll, but I thought the conversation would benefit to readers of this thread. I would like to ask any member that cares to reply why you use a paste polish rather than a cream polish, or why you use a cream polish rather than a paste polish. If you use both, why and how. For clarification, cream polish is a...
I think what mimo was trying to say is that it doesn’t make sense to use high quality polish on low quality shoes.Clarks (the manufacture of the shoes in question) is one of the largest manufacturers of shoes in the world. The SRP of their men’s dress shoes range from $90 to $180 USD. Shoes in this range use lower quality (mostly corrected grain) leather and inherently have a thicker finish than non-corrected grain leather. These shoes are also mass produced in large...
I wouldn't call it a phobia, but yes, you don't want to saturate the leather with too much oil. There is about 4 times as much oil in the cleaner/conditioner as there is in the cream polish, and the cream polish has a higher concentration of oil than a paste polish.
You can get a nice shine from just the GlenKaren cleaner conditioner. As traverscao suggests you need to wait a little while (about an 2 hours) after using it for cleaning and conditioning, then buff well with a horsehair shoe brush. Buffing again the following day will add a little more shine as well. There is no need to use the cream polish (neutral or color) right after the cleaner/conditioner, if fact I would suggest against it. Use the cream polish when you polish...
Unfortunately, international shipping for anything under a case is $25. When you select a country on the order page of the GlenKaren site it will change the shipping cost from $4 to $25 for anything outside of CONUS.
I would probably just stick with the standard horsehair brush that has a 6" wooden handle the length of the brush. That works for about 90% of what you would need a brush for.The length of the bristles is what makes the most difference. A 8" brush will usually have longer bristles (it's a ratio/scale thing) and therefore be softer. For a stiffer brush just take a pair of scissors to a standard 6' brush and cut off a 1/3 of the length of the bristles. This makes for a...
I would use Walnut for the brown shoes in your picture.The water resistant polish has a slightly grainy feel to it, which some people don't care for, but it does smooth out on the shoe. I still use the regular line unless I need to add some additional water resistance to a pair of shoes or boots.I have considered selling brushes, but do not currently. Almost any standard horse hair brush will do, and they typically cost less than $10 at most department stores or online.
Yes, I have a pair of Berluti Club shoes. They retail for around $1,200 US.
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